Flexible Formation System for any Offense

Having the ability to align in virtually any formation and easily get the match-ups desired are the main components of our multiple spread offense.   In order to have the ability to do this, the offense must have a flexible formation system that gains an advantage in the way that it is taught, so that for the players it is easy to learn and align, yet for a defense it is complex to defend because of all of the possible match-ups and adjustments. This system accomplishes exactly that because it possesses the ability to get into multiple personnel groupings, use varying types of movement, and has the structure necessary to get into just about any formation that can be imagined.

This system de-emphasizes the memorization approach.  Many systems require that each player memorize his alignment in every formation call, thus limiting the number of formations that can be effectively used.  In this approach, information is communicated in a “block” approach.  Each player understands which block of information means something to him.  Not all players are required to know the whole call, just the part of the call that means something to him.

The system allows for multiple backfield sets, unbalanced formations, empty formations, quads, bunch, and any other alignment that an offense may want to position players.

In studying formation structures and knowing the rules of the game, we know that the offense must employ at least 7 players on the line of scrimmage, and most offensive formation systems desire to stretch the defense horizontally or add gaps to defend by placing multiple receivers, slots, or wings near the line of scrimmage.  With this in mind, we have identified a common set of “surfaces” in which 3 receivers (which we label as X, Y & Z) align.  From this point on, we will refer to X, Y & Z alignments as a “surface.”  These surfaces serve as our starting point for aligning in a formation.  When X, Y, & Z hear(or see) the surface, they now have all of the information they need to align.  We will have a simple set of adjustments that can be tagged to the surface to slightly vary the X, Y, Z alignments which will be discussed later.

For teaching purposes, we grouped and named our surfaces so there is a common feature to which our players could link their learning.  Again, for us this is a dramatic change from our previous system which was pure memorization.  Our 6 main surfaces are diagrammed below:

Surfaces that begin with R/L indicate a double width surface with a TE.

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Slot twins formations are named with compass directions:

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And two tight end surfaces use animal names:

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The remaining two offensive skill players alignments (J & S) will be communicated with a simple number system.  The backs and quarterback will assume an under center “I” formation if a number is not added to the surface call.  If one number is tagged for the J alignment, then Pistol will become the default set.  We prefer the Pistol set because of the advantages it possesses in both the run and pass game.    A few other tags will be used for common backfield adjustments to add to the ease of communication.

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Tags:

We use a few tags to the formation that allow us to be even more multiple:

  • Bunch:  Puts 2 or 3 Receivers alignment tight to each other.
  • Over:  Puts single receiver to the opposite side of the formation(usually X; Y in East/West)
  • Heavy:  puts tackle to strong side to create unbalanced formation.
  • Wide:  Y splits to 8/9 spot(used with East/West) to get a match-up of a TE on a CB.

Examples:

Rip

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East 5

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Bull 8

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Eagle 5

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South 6

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North 6 Bunch

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Rip 4 Over

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West Heavy

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Empty formations:

If two numbers are used to adjust the backs, J will always adjust to the first digit, and S will adjust to the second digit.  This allows us to create some backfield adjustments and empty sets.

Example:

Rip 76

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Backfield Sets:

We use the terms Strong & Weak to offset the FB when we are under center.  0/1 are number used to create different backfield sets.  We could also move the FB near the line of scrimmage by using 2/3.

Strong Rip

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Movement will be communicated in a block approach also.  To motion a single player, the players letter will be used along with the digit we would like him to move to.

Examples:

Rip 7 J-6

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Rip Z-7

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For multiple shifts and motions, a word communicating that movement will be used.  For ease of communication, the movement will give the surface and post movement alignment, and then a learned initial placement and movement rules of the players involved will be executed.  Because movement and shifts are used to attack a player or adjustment of the defense discovered during the video analysis of a defense, these movements will be used on a week to week basis by game plan.  Therefore, the learning of these movements becomes more manageable and easier to execute because they are given the proper repetition during the game week preparation.

To summarize they key components of this system:

X, Y & Z are communicated to with surface calls which only affect their alignment.  7 surfaces allow us to align in virtually any formation.  X, Y & Z only need to know the surface alignments.  The surfaces have common features and are labeled for ease of learning.  We have a single attached TE with double width surfaces, Slot Twins surfaces, Two TE surfaces, and 2 Receiver(3 back) surfaces.

J is communicated to with #’s that are universal across any surface call.  If a two digit number is called, he will always adjust to the first digit. J only needs to know his number system.

S is adjusted by the second digit of a two digit call using the same number system as J.  S only needs to know the number system.

A limited number of adjustment tags will be used to adjust X, Y & Z to a varied alignment to the surface call.

Under center “I” formation is the default if  number is not used with the call.

A single digit number adjustment automatically. puts the QB & S in a Pistol set.

A limited amount of tags will be used to adjust backfield sets.

Differences for our personnel in learning:

Each player has a limited amount of information to learn:  Previous system required memorization of 20+ formations plus tags and adjustments.  The large amount of memorization limited the number of formations we used.  Now  X, Y & Z need to know 7 alignments(in reality 4-5 because of personnel emphasis in the surfaces), J & S need only to know the number system.  There were things we wanted to get into, or formations we had to come up with names for in opponent breakdowns.  Those limitations no longer exist.

Learning will be communicated with word associations that provide learning cues and memory triggers for each alignment.

Surfaces are learned in pairs, thus eliminating some of the confusion that happens when a formation is tagged with “right” or “left.”

The number of signals that will be communicated for formation are drastically cut down and shortened allowing us to be quicker with our alignment.  Thus our uptempo procedures are even faster putting more stress on a defense when we choose to operate in that mode.

Implementing your formation system:

For us it started with looking at things from the player perspective and committing ourselves to finding a better way.  If you use numbers somewhere else in your system, coming up with a series of words that start with R/L and labeling the spots we number would be the way to go.  Using numbers for two different components of your offensive system will ultimately lead to confusion.  Do the work up front.  We are a multiple formation and personnel grouping offense.  We will never use all of the possibilities that exist in aligning players with this system, but we have the flexibility built in.  This also aids us in breaking down our opponent, and this system certainly has value for a defensive coach who is constantly having to name the multiple formations that offenses present throughout the course of the season.

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My iBook 101+ Pro Style Pistol Offense Plays provides concepts that can be utilized in any offense, not just the pistol. The interactive multimedia book contains 229 pieces of dynamic content and a total of 30 minutes of game film.  I have received some great feedback from coaches who adapted all or some of those ideas in 2013. I was able to consult with several high schools around the country who were interested in this offense and implemented this system.  If you are interested in consultation on the Pistol, please email me grabkj@gmail.com.  Get 101+ PRO STYLE PISTOL OFFENSE PLAYS for your iPad or Mac from the iBookstore

Immediate Feedback for Better Execution – Technology at Practice

At the end of his book, Homer Smith included his ideas for using technology to call plays in a game.  Smith was definitely a visionary.

I don’t claim to be anywhere near Smith in my contributions to this game, but in this article, I’d like to share my vision for the future, hopefully, the near future.

My vision involves rethinking how we practice in terms of giving players feedback so that they can make corrections.  In the 2013 season we utilized my iPad throughout practice to provide instant feedback and the chance for immediate correction.

I was first inspired to use the iPad at practice after seeing a video of Nebraska using it in their spring practice.

My research into the idea of using an iPad at practice was further inspired by this video of it being used with a volleyball team.  The coach first shows a skill that he is looking for in a drill on a video on the iPad, then the players execute the drill while being filmed on the iPad.  I really liked how they alternated between iPads so that when a drill was completed, the player who just finished the drill could view the iPad for reviewing technique.

As I’ve thought about the possibilities available to us in becoming better teachers and coaches on the field through fully utilizing the technology available, we can become much better at what we do.

The standard of what a football practice looks like seems to be shifting.  “Uptempo” has become the norm.  Stopping practice to correct and adjust is frowned upon.  Many coaches of the no-huddle, uptempo offense will tell you that they coach off of film because they don’t want to disrupt the tempo.  Defensive coaches seem to have resigned to the fact that they will just have to deal with it. By definition, feedback waits until later.  The teachable moment doesn’t come until hours after in a film session.

I’m not sure we are doing it correctly.  Granted, there are times when tempo should and must be the focus because that’s how it happens on game day.  Tempo for purely the sake of tempo may leave us missing out on coaching opportunities.  Today’s technology may bridge that gap and allow us to maintain the pace of practice while allowing for immediate feedback and correction.  The challenge, it seems, is to integrate the technology while allowing for maximum repetitions during the allotted practice time.

The big question is how do we accomplish this while keeping a crisp and flowing practice?  Technology should be integrated seamlessly.  Part of the answer may be found in not just obtaining the technology, but more importantly, in having a sound plan to use it.  Let’s take a look at a possible technology plan within a typical practice session.  The focus in this table is from an offense’s view point.

Practice Periods Description Technology Use
1-2 Warm-up
3-6 Individual Technique by Position iPads to film drills; players review after their rep/reps ( 5 iPads utilized; 1 for each position)*
7-8 Special Teams-Punt iPads film specialists on technique; they review after their rep/reps (2 iPads utilized)
9-10 Inside Run & 1 on 1 QB/WR vs. DB iPads film behind offense or defense).  Review reps after unit is finished. (2 iPads)** QB isolated for technique; WR/DB isloated for technique; players review after their reps. (4 ipads – 2 ipads utilized in each position)
11-12 Special Teams-XP/FG iPads film specialists on technique; they review after their rep/reps (2 ipads utilized)
13-15 7 on 7/ OL/DL 1 on 1 iPad behind QB mirroring his movement; ipad on each perimeter reviewing WR technique. QB review after his reps; iPad on OL/DL 1 vs. 1 for review after reps. (5 total)
16-19 Team – 1st team 6 reps followed by 2nd team 4 reps 3 iPads – inside view for OL/TE/RB/QB**; view from each perimeter for receivers. Receivers view reps after; OL (5 total)

*This is the difficult one for a football practice.  Ideally, some kind of live stream can be used between two iPads with a pause and rewind.  One device is recording live while an iPad at the back of the line is serving as a viewing station for the player.  I haven’t exactly found the app or software that would accomplish this yet, but I have seen the technology in other uses, so I believe it is possible.

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**Ideally, a viewing station is set up, possibly under a pop-up tent for glare and visibility issues.  The iPad is utilized through airplay so that it is easier for a group of players to view.

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Managers or injured players would man the iPads.  The iPad isn’t meant to be something that stops or slows down practice, but rather in an uptempo environment allows the player to understand a coaching point that was made by the coach “on the fly.”  At the appropriate time when that player has a minute or so for review, he can go to the iPad on his own or with a coach to review the coaching point that was made during live action.  The idea of having some application that allows for live streaming to an iPad during individual periods allows for players to quickly review their technique while they are waiting to get to the front of the line again.  The goal is to increase player understanding so that execution of techniques on the field improve.

The Coach’s Role

I believe in the beginning, as a skill is being taught for the first time, having a coach running the drill and a coach reviewing with the player would be ideal.  Eventually, players begin to see key body positions to look for.  For example, we teach our receivers a double leg explosion out of their stance.  It’s easy for the receiver to go to an iPad on his own an identify how he did.  He can easily see if he drove off correctly or false stepped or sunk his hips.  The feedback from video gives him a focus the next time that it is his turn.  If there are two coaches available, this makes great use of both coaches.  One coach is giving feedback live while the other is showing the video to the player seconds after it happened, further illustrating the coaching point and solidifying the player’s understanding of exactly what he must do.

At any time in practice, the coach needs to be vocal and have very concise coaching points that identify an error as he sees it live.  For example, if he sees an offensive lineman with incorrect hand placement, teaching the lineman to understand a word like “target” enables the lineman to go back and view the video looking for that exact error and giving him the ability to understand what he must do the next time.  This is something that every coach should aim to do regardless of if there is the technology there or not.  The technology doesn’t necessarily change the coaches role.

The Player’s Role

The player’s role is to develop an eye for what the coach is looking for.  Most staffs only have one  coach at a position.  Possibly a student manager, or an injured player can film the drills, but the player still needs to have a sound understanding of what the terminology of the position coach means.  This is done in the installation process.  The player must be held accountable for learning the terminology.  Creating a library of short videos which illustrate your coaching points and techniques will help players have a better understanding of exactly what they are supposed to do to perform their job correctly.  See “Flipped Coaching” for more on this topic.

Using the technology on a limited budget

Having multiple iPads and viewing stations around the practice field would be the ideal situation.  The reality is most of us don’t have that budget. An iPad wasn’t in our budget at BW, so I used my own.  To me, the value of giving players immediate feedback was well worth using my own iPad.

We did use the iPad in different drills.  Players were told that the could use the iPad at any point during the drill to review what they did.  That meant that filming of the drill stopped, but the drill continued.  At times the player would go to the video on his own to better understand what he did right or wrong.  I should not here that video is a great way to solidify the correct technique, just as much as it is to correct an error.  Other times I would instruct the player to look at the video, and even go to the iPad to review it with him.

Our specialists used the iPad to review their technique.  Our kickers would have the student manager film the field goal/extra point periods.  After, the kickers would use the iPad to review their technique so they could work on perfecting their technique during the remainder of practice.

We used the iPad for inside run periods.  Our tight ends coach used the iPad to review the inside run period with his players in the period immediately following inside run.  He felt it was very valuable because we would be running those plays again in team, and he wanted his players to understand exactly what they were doing right or wrong so that they could perform correctly when those plays were repped again.

We used the iPad in team for a view of the offensive line, TE, QB, and RB from behind.  We instructed players and position coaches that they use it at any time to review a play and make corrections.  At times, the use was player initiated. Hearing an offensive lineman say, “Let me see the iPad” was common.  The running back coach might grab it to show the running back an aim point or footwork error.  The offensive line coach might grab it and take the entire line to show the a certain defensive stunt and how he wanted them to pick it up.  Our student manager was instructed to keep filming each play until someone wanted the iPad to view, and to resume filming as soon as they were done viewing it.

The video below shows some different ways we used the iPad at practice.

While having a team of managers filming with iPads all over the field would be ideal, we found a way to make just one iPad beneficial to us.  Again, the technology must be integrated seamlessly, and coaching must be concise.  Doing these two things can put the technology to work for you and help improve performance on the field, which is the ultimate goal.

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My iBook 101+ Pro Style Pistol Offense Plays provides concepts that can be utilized in any offense, not just the pistol. The interactive multimedia book contains 229 pieces of dynamic content and a total of 30 minutes of game film.  I have received some great feedback from coaches who adapted all or some of those ideas in 2013. I was able to consult with several high schools around the country who were interested in this offense and implemented this system.  If you are interested in consultation on the Pistol, please email me grabkj@gmail.com.  Get 101+ PRO STYLE PISTOL OFFENSE PLAYS for your iPad or Mac from the iBookstore

 

Top 13 of ’13

These were the 13 most read posts in 2013 on this site:

1. The Mother Lode of Zone Running Game Resources

2. Compilation of Diamond Pistol Backfield Resources

3. No Huddle & Tempo Resources

4. Pistol resource notebook

5. Game Planning Resources

6. One Stop for Your Offense Resources

7. Quick Passing Game Resources

8. iBook

9. The “Power O” Play

10. One Word Play Calls

11. Play Action Passing Resources

12. Urban Meyer – On Edge Teaching/Coaching

13. Downhill Pistol Running Game

The first of its kind, 101+ Pro Style Pistol Offense Plays provides concepts that can be utilized in any offense, not just the pistol. The interactive multimedia book contains 229 pieces of dynamic content and q total of 30 minutes of game film. I have received some great feedback from coaches who adapted all or some of those ideas in 2013. Get 101+ PRO STYLE PISTOL OFFENSE PLAYS for your iPad or Mac from the iBookstore.

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Evolution of Concept Based Passing

I recently read an article titled, “Re-Thinking Concept Based Passing” by Jay Mathews, a 23 year high school coaching veteran from Birmingham, Alabama.  Mathews writes, “Football is forever evolving and if you aren’t re-tooling you will find yourself struggling. At the same time- it is so important to never leave what you are good at or forget the fundamentals that has made you successful.”  He goes on to break down the different components of the passing game as a way of looking at possible ways to restructure passing game concepts and thought processes.

The philosophy of evolving as an offense is one that I have utilized throughout my coaching career.  I discuss evolution of offensive systems and layout steps to work through that process in my first online article on American Football Monthly, “Creating an Offensive System.”

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I’ve been speaking about the idea of evolution vs. revolution in clinics for some years now.  Just because someone presents a good idea doesn’t me that you should or could adopt it.  Finding the idea is merely the first step, figuring out how it fits and how to implement it requires much more work.  I cover Andrew Coverdale’s process and some other ideas here and here.  The process of evolving your system needs to begin with quality control.

Our system has continued to evolve, and the process is already underway for the 2014 season.  There are plenty of great ideas out there.  Remember that research is only part of it.  To get your research started, I have shared links that I have accumulated over the years.  There are over 700 links to different offensive topics in this post.

Here are three examples of how we have evolved our offense at BW.  First is the use of the pistol set.  What started as a way to take away defensive check to the back set evolved into our base backfield set. Read more in “Our Evolution of the Pistol Set.”

Our four vertical package evolved when we saw opportunity for it to be a concept we could utilize against any coverage.  We incorporated variations with little new teaching across the variations. Read more in “Four Keys to a Successful Four Vertical Package.

Finally, we the spacing route was already in our offensive system, but we integrated curl, corner/flat(smash) as well as play action components into what we call our spacing concept. Read about it in “A Multiple Passing Attack with the Spacing Concept.”  The way we incorporated several route combinations into one concept by finding the commonalities and tagging the differences allowed us to streamline our passing game though process and practice time.  This is similar to what Mathews is writing about in his article.

In terms of concept passing, Dan Gonzalez shares his ideas on conceptualizing the passing game on his website.  You could spend hours here reading through his ideas.  Gonzalez laid out concept based teaching as a framework for the passing game in his first book Concept Passing:  Teaching the Modern Passing Game.  Recently, he re-thought the whole idea and reworked how he calls and thinks about the passing game in his second book, Recoded and Reloaded: An Updated Structure for a Complete Passing game at Any Level.  Read my review of Dan’s book here.  Both books are great resources to have on your book shelf. Dan also wrote a guest post for this site, “Creating Explosive Plays in the Passing Game.”9851177_orig

I’d be remiss to not mention Dub Maddox and Darin Slack in an article about the passing game.  They provide a very sound structure or operating system for any passing game. Their R4 system is explained in detail in From Head Set to Helmet.  I’ve benefitted greatly from both their coaching materials and the time I’ve spent talking ball with Darin and Dub.

Finally, my iBook 101+ Pro Style Pistol Offense Plays provides concepts that can be utilized in any offense, not just the pistol. The interactive multimedia book contains 229 pieces of dynamic content and a total of 30 minutes of game film.  I have received some great feedback from coaches who adapted all or some of those ideas in 2013. I was able to consult with several high schools around the country who were interested in this offense and implemented this system.  If you are interested in consultation on the Pistol, please email me grabkj@gmail.com.  Get 101+ PRO STYLE PISTOL OFFENSE PLAYS for your iPad or Mac from the iBookstore

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Incrementalism – Get Better Everyday

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“The best thing about the future is that it comes one day at a time.”
― Abraham Lincoln

During our preseason camp I posted a thought on incrementalism.  Incrementalism is making changes by degrees or in small steps.  I really like the website www.aplayaday.com; it’s perfect for learning something new in this game everyday.  The videos presented daily (Monday through Friday) are essentially mini-clinics.  While you may not use that particular play or concept, you have a chance to learn about it, because at some point an opponent may use it.

Because the videos are short, you can watch them while having your morning coffee, during your lunch break, or even between classes.  The effect is you are learning or getting more detail on five concepts a week.  Sometimes it’s tougher to carve out time to sit down and watch an hour long clinic video, but this concept of the mini-clinic is much simpler.

If you have an idea that you would like to share, there are simple instructions for submitting your own material and helping others make this game better.  I submitted a video.  It’s up as a free sample that can be viewed here.

The sample is from my iBook. My iBook 101+ Pro Style Pistol Offense Plays provides concepts that can be utilized in any offense, not just the pistol. The interactive multimedia book contains 229 pieces of dynamic content and q total of 30 minutes of game film.  I have received some great feedback from coaches who adapted all or some of those ideas in 2013. Get 101+ PRO STYLE PISTOL OFFENSE PLAYS for your iPad or Mac from the iBookstore

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Quick/Naked from the +3 for TD

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http://www.playmakerpro.com

In the 2013 Stagg Bowl game, Whitewater called a quick/naked play on 3rd & goal from the 3.  The QB looked left for the quick out, pump faked and rolled to the right.  The h-back in a wing to the left, the slot to the right and the wide receiver on the line were running a flood type of concept. The defense actually had it covered pretty well which should leave the run to the QB as the only option left.  However, the wide receiver runs a route that is very tough to defend.  He shows that he is going to he corner of the end zone for a fade (which he caught earlier for a TD).  At about 7 yards deep into the end zone he plants and breaks straight down to the front pylon.  The QB makes a perfect throw for the TD.

The timing of the play with the QB execute a pump fake to the left and rolling right helps this route, as does the rest of the routes in the concept because the other defenders are covering other routes and there is no one to get under the route coming down to the front pylon.

Read more on quick/naked here and here.

Here’s the video:

http://espn.go.com/video/clip?id=espn:10174573

My iBook 101+ Pro Style Pistol Offense Plays provides concepts that can be utilized in any offense, not just the pistol. The interactive multimedia book contains 229 pieces of dynamic content and q total of 30 minutes of game film.  I have received some great feedback from coaches who adapted all or some of those ideas in 2013. Get 101+ PRO STYLE PISTOL OFFENSE PLAYS for your iPad or Mac from the iBookstore

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Stunt 4-3 Defense

In 1999, I had the opportunity to learn the Stunt 4-3 from Don Richardson.  Don was the defensive coordinator at the time at Amherst Steel High School where I was an assistant.  He knew the defense inside and out and learned it directly from George Perles and his staff when Perles was at Michigan State.  When I became a head coach at the high school level, it was the defense that we used.

While many teams don’t necessarily run the stunt 4-3 as a system, some of the components have been integrated into many defensive systems.

I spent the day talking football with Don today, and he had a great quote.  “I hate the damn guy who keeps running his best play.”  Don’s point was that many coaches will grow impatient and stop calling a play that’s effective for them because it gets shut down a few times.  If it’s your best play, you need to stick with it and keep calling it.  I’ve learned a lot of football from Don and I’ve always viewed him as a mentor.  It was great to talk some ball with him again.

Don is still running the stunt 4-3 and has added adjustments and evolved the defense to stop today’s offenses.  It was always great defense for us even with average personnel.

Here are some resources and articles on the Stunt 4-3:

Here’s our defensive playbook.  I’m not sure how it got on the web, but it’s out there now.  We used Power Point and hyperlinks to create a very dynamic playbook.  It looks like someone got it mid change before we finished bringing it to a different school.  Half is in our previous team’s colors.

On page 114 is an article by Perles.

The 4-3 tilted nose tackle: history, scheme and the Buccaneers

’76 Steelers

Super Bowl X Pittsburgh vs Dallas

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My iBook 101+ Pro Style Pistol Offense Plays provides concepts that can be utilized in any offense, not just the pistol. I have received some great feedback from coaches who adapted all or some of those ideas in 2013. Get 101+ PRO STYLE PISTOL OFFENSE PLAYS for your iPad or Mac from the iBookstore