Available: Wide Receiver Skills and Drills in an Uptempo System

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Get it here for iPad/Mac

Tyler Dorton has coached 3 all-state players and 7 all-conference players in 4 years.  He’s worked hard on learning his craft and assembling a series of drills that allow him to accomplish much in a small period of individual time allotted to him in practice.  Dorton presents over 80 minutes worth of drills detailing not just what, but also the “why” behind the drills.  This is an outstanding manual for any receivers coach looking to refine his players skills and teach them to be effective on game day.

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Drop the Bomb on Opposing Defenses

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Foreword

Explosive plays matter.  Other than turnovers, explosive plays are typically cited as the single statistic that is the best predictor of wins.  Good offenses generate explosive plays.  A common saying among spread coaches is “throw short to people who score.” While we certainly agree with this statement in par; unless we have an incredible talent advantage, it is difficult to be explosive if we only throw short.  Some years we have fast receivers.  Some years we don’t.  Some years we have receivers who can make things happen after the catch.  Some years we don’t.  As offensive coaches we have to make sure that we give our players a chance to make plays down the field.  To do this we have to find ways to manufacture vertical throws.  By using the term “manufacture” it should be pointed out that these ideas are created through play design, not simply by saying, “Johnny, you are faster than everyone else…go deep.”  While that tactic also has its merits, and we have been blessed on occasion with that type of player, it is not the norm for us.  When we create opportunities to attack vertically, not only can explosive plays be generated, but these down-the-field shots protect the rest of our offense.  Safeties and corners can no longer be as aggressive in run support or in robbing short patterns and eliminating quick underneath completions.

In a previous work for Coaches Edge Technologies entitled Quick Rhythm Option RoutesI discussed in great detail two routes packages we feel are cutting edge and applicable to many different offensive systems.  Both packages are ball-control passes that can get the ball out quickly but also provide the potential for big plays.  We will look at a variety of methods we have used to engineer explosive passes.  These passes are designed to create explosive play opportunities every time they are called, not just in the hope of the defense missing a tackle or a receiver making a great run after a catch.  The hope is that even when they are unsuccessful, these ideas can still put a defense on its heels.

Josh Herring

Introduction and Philosophy

In 2007 I fondly recall our team throwing the ball all over the field on nearly every snap.  We had a record-breaking quarterback who was a four-year starter and a veteran, physical offensive line.  We had two outstanding receivers who both went over 1,000 yards receiving, complemented by numerous role players who could block and catch the football.  Over 50% of our passing game was three-step gun dropback passing, often down the field with intermediate and vertical throws.  At that time, in rural North Alabama, very few teams threw the ball more than ten times a game.  Coverages were extremely basic.  A jailbreak screen had a high likelihood of scoring if called in any given passing situation.  For a “passing team” those were the days.  Things have changed.  Currently (at least in our state), most high school coaches have more time with their kids than college coaches.  Most teams practice all summer after a ten-practice spring training period.  High school teams participate in off campus OTAs with other teams during the summer which closely resemble the NFL training camp model.  Defensive tactics have advanced at an alarming rate.  In a given season we will typically see the following:  base 4-2, 4-3, 3-3, and 3-4 fronts (often with multiple combinations in the same game), blitzes not just from inside and outside linebackers but cornerbacks and safeties, and a dizzying array of pass coverages, including complex split-field combo coverages like those favored by the University of Alabama and TCU.  Pass rushes are better.  Defensive backs are better.  Blitz schemes are more exotic.  Coverage schemes are sounder, better taught, and refined through countless repetitions in summer 7-on-7 competitions.  Against better competition, if we intend to dropback pass 30 or more times a game…our QB is in for a very sore Saturday morning.

We want to create explosive down-the-field plays in the passing game like everyone else.  However, we have had to find numerous new ways to get those throws while keeping our QB off of his back.  We came to the realization several years ago after an up and down offensive season and numerous conversations with college and high school coaches, that we had to make some adaptations to our offense. Simply put, defenses were often willing to concede short throws on quick game and screens.  We began to face talented defenses that were willing to play a conservative base front that maintained overhang players on both sides and played soft coverage with a “don’t give up big plays” philosophy.  Going into a game, they had decided to force us into a “constraint” offense.  Constraint plays are plays which protect the base offense and serve as “counters.”  In discussing this problem with other coaches, we found that many of them were facing the same issues.  As an example, while much less common now than at the advent of the up-tempo spread era, here is a common case study in which the defense controls offensive tactics rather than the other way around:

Team A was almost exclusively a 2×2, 10 personnel spread team. When they started spreading people out, they found that it emptied the box, and they could run zone read effectively.  They had a very basic passing game and protected their read option running game with bubble screens.  Team B was good on defense.  They played a 4-3 Cover 2/4 defense.  They apexed their outside linebackers to collapse on the zone read and still stressed the passing game.  The outside linebackers were athletic and could cover.  When Team A threw bubbles and quick game to constrain the outside linebackers, Team B was in cover 2 and take it away.  When Team A became frustrated, they tried to throw four verticals.  Team B converted from cover 2 to cover 4 due to their read system and matched all four vertical patterns.  Team A could find no rhythm on offense.  They moved the ball at times but had difficulty creating explosive plays.  Team B was perfectly content in allowing Team A to throw bubble screens for 4 yard gains.  In the red zone, Team B clamped down time after time and ended up winning a close game. 

In a clinic talk in 2009, I heard Mark Hudspeth remark that he had learned that a spread team, if always in a 10 personnel 2×2 spread look, is giving the defense the best of both worlds.  They can rally 7 and perhaps even 9 defenders against the run and drop 7 into coverage.  By relying only on box counts (or to use a more current innovation as an example – run pass combos), the defense can often dictate.  We believe there is a lot of truth to this.  We don’t want to be forced to check the ball down all game.  While our enthusiasm about run-pass combos is as devoted as anyone’s, there are times when we need “attitude” plays even as a spread offense.  We want to attack on every snap, whether in the run or pass game.  One of the things we hope to show is that teams which operate in a spread environment can use simple tweaks such as tight-end /wing sets and multiple personnel to benefit the rest of their offense without being overly complex.  For instance, it can be surprising how defenses respond to a two back set when playing a “passing team.”  We might even be in 10 personnel, but simply by aligning with a receiver in the backfield, we may automatically check to an 8 man front.

We are committed to trying to take a minimum of two downfield attempts per quarter.  In our way of thinking, down-the-field throws are constraint plays like screens.  We must throw them even when they are not working, because even when they aren’t working….they are.  Even unsuccessful screens can tire out a defensive line and make defenders run from sideline to sideline.  In a similar way, attacking downfield makes defensive backs (and coordinators) nervous.  Even an attempt that falls incomplete can create space for the short to intermediate passing game and make fast-filling safeties hesitate just a little more before committing to the run.

As a “spread” offense we have realized that changing personnel and/or using “pro-style” formations does not mean we have to change anything about our philosophy or scheme.  We are not going to be “put in a box” as to our style of offense.  While the ideas here are going to be shown as applied in a spread environment, most of them are applicable in any offense.  We have divided our deep ball package into a variety of categories.  Some are “attitude” plays where we are attempting to assert our authority and dictate to the defense.  Others are constraint plays that protect other parts of our offense.  We should note that in no way is this work a comprehensive study in attacking vertically down the field.  We certainly are not arguing that any of these methods are the best way to take deep shots.  The best way is what works for you.  Instead, we will look at applications within our offense and the thought processes that led to them.  Hopefully this will provoke thinking and reflection about how your own offense can adapt to attack vertically.

Our hope is that in presenting our philosophy and methods, you can find something of use for your offense, regardless of system.

Coming Soon on all devices: Manufacturing Vertical Shots

Herring Snippet Covers.001

Manufacturing Vertical Shots by Josh Herring is the second volume in his series:  Rapid Precision Offense.  Herring’s first volume Quick Rhythm Option Routes is an outstanding coaching resource for any offense.  He includes ways to include the routes into many concepts from multiple formations.  He also illustrates using quick option routes packaged with runs to create run-pass options.

Through his works Josh Herring has shown he is a bright football mind.  Check out his first iBook.  It will definitely have you excited to see the new one.  Both volumes include over 2 1/2 hours of video.  Like all Coaches Edge products it is full of the details you need to implement the concept now.

From Herring’s Quick Rhythm Option Routes

Introduction of Quick Rhythm Option Routes by Josh Herring

Slot Option with Run Combo (an RPO)

The “Dodge” concept

From Quick Rhythm Option Routes Ch1: “Sloppy” (Slot Option)

Through text, 68 diagrams, 20 instructional videos, and 72 game video cut-ups, Herring gives all the details necessary to install the quick rhythm option passing game.  These concepts can fit into any offensive system and enhance receiver abilities.  With the details provided, these concepts can be added to a system to create a high percentage passing game with explosive opportunities. Video totals over 2 hours and 30 minutes.

I am excited about what Coach Herring has produced with Coaches Edge Technologies.  This is something every offensive coordinator needs to see.  These high percentage, yet explosive routes can be implemented into any offense.  With over 2.5 hours of instructional video and play analysis, Herring gives you the details you need to implement these concepts.  Included in the “Further Review” section are over 70 cut-ups which can be viewed in regular speed and slow forward/reverse as well. Below is the Foreword by Dan Gonzalez.

Here’s what Dan has to say about Quick Rhythm Option Routes by Josh Herring.

I met Josh several years ago, as we shared our viewpoint on the passing game.  I immediately sensed that he was truly a student of the game – not just concerned with the “X’s and O’s” of football plays, but with the individual details that make these plays come to life.   With that common ground, we struck up a friendship, and have exchanged ideas ever since.   I can honestly say that Coach Herring is my favorite kind of coach – one who strives for continuous improvement, rather than resting on the laurels of one or two or three or five good statistical seasons.  He’s dedicated to his craft, and is always improving his methods of teaching.  So, when Keith Grabowski asked me about potential authors for iBooks, Josh was at the very top of the list.

Quick Rhythm Option Routes represents a very pertinent, essential topic for coaches at all levels.  With the exception of the highest levels of college football, most teams only have one or two true receiving threats.  Further, few teams have a sure fire breakaway threat.  Coach Herring illustrates for us, in great detail, how a team cannot only survive but thrive in the passing game under such circumstances.  Not only does this work cover the basic option routes that are perhaps covered on the clinic circuit, but provides the basis for an entire series from which to base a passing game.

The technical detail and video illustration that accompany the text and diagrams are second to none; the reader will feel like a participant in one of Josh’s quarterback meetings.  With over two hours of video, not to mention the raw video footage provided as a reference tool, coaches will be armed with everything they need to not only implement into their system, but troubleshoot coaching points and counter defensive tactics as well.  Oftentimes, clinic attendees are left to their own devices as they install; not so with this work.

No longer can a coach simply throw their hands up and say “we can’t get open” – no matter what level of talent, a competent player should be able to gain leverage to receive a pass.  In other words, a 4.8 receiver can beat a 4.4 Division 1 linebacker prospect by getting on his inside or outside shoulder and getting a well-timed pass.  Over and over again, Josh explains (and actually shows us) how to make this happen for the offense.

Quick Rhythm Option Routes is the first in what I hope to be many works from Josh Herring; he is an outstanding coach and we can all learn from him, regardless of one’s level of play.

About Coach Josh Herring

Josh Herring recently completed his 5th year as Offensive Coordinator and QB Coach at Lassiter High School in Marietta, Georgia. Known for their wide-open up-tempo offense, the Trojans have set numerous individual and team offensive records during his tenure.  Competing in the state’s largest classification, they reached the semi-finals in 2011 and won consecutive region championships in 2012 and 2013 with an undefeated regular season in 2012.  His QBs have led the region, county, and state in passing and 5 different offensive players have made All-State or Honorable Mention All-State teams, with a number going on to play collegiately, including in BCS conferences such as the SEC and ACC.  Coach Herring began his coaching career at Colbert Heights High School in Tuscumbia, Alabama, and over the course of four seasons served in various positions including Offensive Coordinator, Quarterbacks Coach, Wide Receivers Coach, and Running Backs Coach.  In 2007, his first year as offensive coordinator, the program achieved a school-record for wins and broke nearly every school offensive record.  His QB at Colbert Heights finished his 4 year career as Alabama’s all-time completions leader, ranking in the top 10 nationally. He spent the next two seasons as Wide Receivers Coach and Passing Game Coordinator at Pelham High School in Pelham, Alabama.  Coach Herring and his wife Ashley are both educators, and he teaches AP Government at Lassiter.

Dictate to the Defense

Dan Gonzalez Webinar Part 1

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I’ve always had a problem with “take what the defense gives you”.  We must realize that the defense wants you to be conservative, so they don’t have to defend the whole field. Study will show that champions don’t use numbers in the box as a means to run or not to run (or pass or not to pass). Championship teams attack with their strengths and do not let others deter them. – Dan Gonzalez

Coach Gonzalez’s webinar is set for February 10th at 8:30pm EST.  This webinar is loaded with information and sound concepts for attacking and dictating to a defense.  Gonzalez has a great football mind.  He has utilized his talent to help a number of high schools around the country reach their full potential on offense.  While his ideas may seem complex, he presents it in an easily understood format.  You will not be disappointed by this webinar.

Webinar is available live as scheduled.  If you are unable to sit in on the live event, you will be able to purchase the recording.

Register here:

http://www.anymeeting.com/PIID=EB54D881894A30

Email me grabkj@gmail.com.  Put “Gonzalez” in the subject line. Upon your registration you will receive a code for A Coaching Arsenal iBook and be entered in a drawing to win 5 Coaches Edge current or future titles of your choice.

Message from Coach Gonzalez on his Webinar series

From Coach Gonzalez:

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I am VERY excited as the work for the webinar shapes up.  I’ve been putting the finishing touches on the presentation, and think it will be an excellent primer to both the upcoming iBooks and subsequent webinars.

We are scheduled to go for 90 minutes, but the content might honestly run over.  If we do, we hope you can stay plugged in.  We are set for Tuesday, February 10, from 8:30 – 10 pm Eastern.  The registration link can be found here.

As far as content is concerned, I will not simply regurgitate old information (though I might reference some previous work); these sessions are intended to advance and expound upon the iBooks, although the teaching is conceptual and it is not necessary to know my terminology etc in order to get the full benefit of the lecture.

The main bullet points are as follows:

•Know what you want to be on offense

•Dictate to the Defense!

•Creating conflict in defenses

•Using tempo as a weapon

•Down and Distance considerations

•The Scoring Zone

•Making all of the above fit your personnel

This is a very broad, 50 thousand-foot overview; each bullet will have several subtopics.  For example, will also dive into the GAP SCHEME run game that I have used, as well all attachments and tags.  I will cover formationing, and touch game planning and teaching considerations as well.

As stated earlier these topics will flow nicely into not only the iBooks, but into upcoming webinars as well.  For example, Webinar 2 will feature the Cover 3 section of my game planning tool that I call HIT LISTS – designed to give coaches brainstorming capabilities, while still allowing to stay in the confines of their offense.

I’m very excited about this stuff and am hoping you are as well

Dan

Get Dan Gonzalez’s The Need for Change and The Blue Print.

Dan Gonzalez webinar series will be packed with information that any offensive coach can use.  Check it out here.

Register here

Email me grabkj@gmail.com.  Put “Gonzalez” in the subject line. Upon your registration you will receive a code for A Coaching Arsenal iBook and be entered in a drawing to win 5 Coaches Edge current or future titles of your choice.

The Rhythm Feature of the Passing Game

Homer Smith 1998 Homer Smith Rhythm Feature

The images above show Homer Smith’s 1997 Arizona playbook.  You can see that Smith believed in calibrating route and getting the ball out at precise times.  This is a fundamental of the passing game that has been around a long time, though it’s taken on different names and presentation.

The premise is that the ball should be out on the the last step of a 5-step drop in 1.8 seconds and on a hitch-up step in 2.4 seconds. In this way the route and the quarterback’s eyes and feet are in sync.  In looking a Smith’s diagrams you can see that speed outs, spot routes and curls and deep corner routes are out in 2.4 seconds.  Being able to calibrate your system in this way allows for the ball to be out before many protections break down.  This is a sound way of developing a passing game.  To learn more about this type of progression and passing game, check out Dan Gonzalez’s The Need for Change and The Blue Print.  Gonzalez has been a proponent of this type of progression as he spent time learning and corresponding with the late Smith.  This principle remains as sound today as it was when it was first developed decades ago.  Gonzalez has been able to package it for use in today’s offenses.

Dan Gonzalez webinar series will be packed with information that any offensive coach can use.  Check it out here.

Register here

Email me grabkj@gmail.com.  Put “Gonzalez” in the subject line. Upon your registration you will receive a code for A Coaching Arsenal iBook and be entered in a drawing to win 5 Coaches Edge current or future titles of your choice.

The Hitch – Detailed Info from Bill Mountjoy

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Coach Bill Mountjoy always passes along great information, and here is some more on an “old school” play that is as effective than ever.

Coach Mountjoy is one of Dan Gonzalez’s influences and mentors.  Dan has put together a great series on Developing an Offensive System, with part 1The Need for Change and part 2 The Blue Print available now.

Dan Gonzalez’s iBook is available now for a limited time at $39.99 ($20 off the regular price).  Get it here. This iBook is loaded with content.  Gonzalez goes into detail on the essentials of putting together an offensive system through instructional video clips and interactives.  60 instructional videos explain concepts and analyze plays in detail.  Over 50 multi-angle cut-ups of plays are included for your own review and study as well.  The total minutes of video included is just over 2 hours. Learn more about what is included here and here.

The introductory sale applies to  The Need for Change as well.  Get $5 off Part I.  Read about The Need for Change here and here.  Get it here.

If you get both Part 1 & 2, you are getting over 3 hours worth of video as well as text, interactive presentations, and diagrams.  Gonzalez put the highest level of detail into these manuals.

Here is a message from one of Dan’s clients:

I asked their coach, Ryan Schartz, if he’d write a bit on how they have benefited:

Last winter my offensive staff and I knew we had a group of players suited to throw the ball.  Our run and shoot system was by no means broken, but it did limit some of the the things we wanted to be able to do.  After reading Dan’s book Re-coded and Reloaded, it dawned on me that this was the system to use.  Installment started in the spring and continued into the summer.  The language that he uses allows players to learn quickly.  Our kids have commented several times that it is much easier to learn than our former system.  His system was an easy transition as it has many run and shoot concepts built in. One of our main objectives was to be able to get our RBs out in to routes out of the backfield.  The Gonzalez system more than allows an offense to use all 5 receivers.  The best part, though is the rhythm passing and progression allows the QB to make his reads quick and decisive. After using parts of it for the first 3 weeks of the season, we have noticed that there is much flexibility in attacking defenses.  This is all coming from at team that traditionally runs the football 80% of the time.  Dan has been terrific!  He is readily available to help explain and give advice.  Although we have not changed much of our run game, his passing system has been a wonderful resource for our program.

Ryan Schartz
Head Coach
Fort Osage High School
Independence, MO

From Coach Mountjoy:

Joe Gibbs’ 3 Step Drop Back Passes (he always said the HITCH was the single most effective play in his offense BECAUSE it was an easy  completion that was like a SWEEP which was around the corner & 6 yds. downfield, & it you rolled up to stop it the WR would convert to the FADE (for a big play).  So in effect, it was a short pass, a deep pass, and a sweep, all rolled up into one!

HITCH” depends on play of Corner ((5-8 yds deep AND “bailing”), PLUS the Flat Coverage. “60 SERIES” We relies MOSTLY on “Pre-Snap Looks” (PSL):

THREE STEP DROPBACK PASS

HERE IS OUR WHOLE PHILOSOPHY IN A NUTSHELL. PICTURE YOURSELF AS THE QUARTERBACK IN THE FOLLOWING EXAMPLE:

X—————O-O-C-O-O-Y
————-H——–Q——————–Z

———————-R

YOU HAVE TWO MEN SPREAD ACROSS THE FIELD – X AND Z. IF EITHER OF THE TWO MEN IS SINGLE OPEN (CB BAILING), YOU SHOULD THROW TO HIM ALL DAY. IF YOUR OPPONENT SENDS SOMEONE OUT TO HELP COVER HIM, YOU SHOULD RUN! THIS IS THE FIRST THING WE DO. WE CHECK OUR WIDE RECEIVERS. IF THEY ARE SINGLE COVERED, WE GO TO OUR 3 STEP GAME.

ALL OF THE ABOVE IS ASSUMING THE CORNERS ARE OFF AND “BAILING”. WE DO NOT LIKE THE 3 STEP GAME INTO HARD CORNERS. SO, IF THE CORNERS ARE OFF AND BAILING – HOW DOES THE DEFENSE HELP THEM? CHECK THE ALIGNMENT OF THE MAN RESPONSIBLE FOR THE FLAT. HE CAN LINE UP IN ANY OF 4 PLACES.

——–W—-E
X————–F
X——————O-O-C-O-O-Y
—————-H——-Q——————–Z

————————R

1. “F” = “FORCE” (8 OR 9 TECHNIQUE ON LOS)
2. “E” = “STACKED ON OUTSIDE HIP OF DE” OR SLIGHTLY WIDER
3. “W” = “WALKAWAY” (1/2 WAY OUT)
4. “X” = “ON X” (OUTSIDE; HEAD; OR INSIDE SHADE) = RARE

“FEWX” DETERMINES THE USE OF THE 3 STEP GAME IN SITUATIONS WHERE THE CORNER IS OFF AND BAILING. EXAMPLE:

A) “HITCH” = YOU WOULD NOT THROW THE HITCH VS. THE “X” POSITION (UNLESS YOU WANTED TO LIMIT YOUR CHOICE TO THE INSIDE RECEIVER). IF YOU THROW IT VS. THE “W” POSITION – YOU HAVE TO READ HIM CAREFULLY AND BE SURE HE IS HELD DOWN BY THE INSIDE RECEIVER. IT IS GREAT VS. THE “F” AND “E” POSITIONS, AND YOU WILL PROBABLY NOT GO TO THE INSIDE RECEIVER VS. THE “E” POSITION.

B) “SLANT” = YOU WOULD WANT TO THROW THE SLANT VS. THE “X” POSITION IF HE IS IN AN OUTSIDE SHADE OR HEAD UP (IF HE IS IN AN INSIDE SHADE – DON’T THROW IT UNLESS YOU SPEND A TON OF TIME TEACHING THE “SPECIAL” RELEASE REQUIRED). VS. THE “W” POSITION IT IS VERY GOOD IF THE DEFENDER IS PULLED OUT BY THE INSIDE RECEIVER’S FLAT ROUTE (OTHERWISE – THE SLANT IS TAKEN AWAY AND THE FLAT SHOULD BE THERE). VS. THE “F” AND “E” POSITIONS YOU WILL HAVE TO HIT THE SLANT QUICKLY BEFORE THEY HAVE A CHANCE TO WORK UNDER IT (IF THEY HANG – THE FLAT ROUTE COMES OPEN).

C) “UP” (FADE) = THE ONLY PART OF OUR 3 GAME WE REALLY LIKE TO CALL VS. HARD CORNERS. HIT THE W.O. IN THE “HOLE” 18-22 YDS. DEEP BETWEEN THE CORNER AND SAFETY. CAN PUT INSIDE RECEIVER ON A “SEAM” ROUTE UP THE HASH TO HOLD THE SAFETY, OR ON A FLAT ROUTE TO HOLD THE CORNER (WHICHEVER YOU NEED TO DO).

(see “FLAT TERMINOLOGY” ATTACHED at bottom):

PS: We like SMOKE to WR on the backside of Trips (3×1 sets). We like Hitch from 2×2 sets based on FLAT coverage in attachment (generalities).

COACHING THE QB & RECEIVER ON THE “HITCH”:

I.      QB CROSS STEP FOOTWORK IN DROPPING BACK 3 STEPS ON THE HITCH ROUTE:

1.       Pivot on the left foot and take a long step back toward the set-up spot with the right foot.  Then use cross-over action to the set-up spot.

2.      Starting with the right foot, you will take 3 steps and “Stop”, “ready” to pass.  You must have stopped and be ready to pass before the receiver makes his final break (on at LEAST 2 steps more than the QB took).

3.      Open your shoulders at an angle NOT TO EXCEED 90 degrees to the LOS and look straight down the field, seeing your reads as you go back.  Know where you are going with the ball by the time you reach the set-up spot.  IT IS IMPORTANT FOR THE QB TO KEEP HIS SHOULDERS AT A RIGHT ANGLE TO LOS, AND HIS FOREHEAD PARALLEL TO THE LOS ON HIS FIRST STEP SO HE CAN SEE THE FIELD.   ON STEP 2 & 3 TRANFER YOUR VISION TO THE THROWING AREA.

4.       The ball must be held chest high and with two hands.  Always be ready to unload the ball quickly.

5.      Stop in the “Ready” position without any resetting so you can pass immediately if necessary.

6.      THREE STEP DROP  (“QUICK DROP”):
A.      The 3 step drop is a 1 + 2 step drop, with 1 full stride and 2 short gathering strides – planting on the third step and throw. Always stop with short steps and come to balance before throwing.
B.      It is coordinated with the quick passing game.  Receivers run 5 step breaks.
C.      Think in terms of the set-up spot being 3 to 4 yards deep.  Set up in .8 seconds and throw the HITCH (timing route) in 1.3.

II.   WR ALIGN 12 YARDS FROM H/Y WITH OUTSIDE FOOT BACK  STEPS ON HITCH:

1.  First step with your outside foot.

2.  Your fifth step will find you on your outside foot (at 6 yards deep).  Plant this foot and pivot your inside hip to the outside – staying low and stationary.  Turn your eyes to the QB first and foremost.

3.  EXPECT the ball to be on the way BEFORE you turn your head.

4.  After the catch roll to the outside (you are a broken “arm tackle” away from a score)!

III.   ESTABLISHING TIMING BETWEEN QB’s & RECEIVERS:

THIS APPLIES TO “TIMING” ROUTES ONLY (THE “HITCH” IS A “TIMING” ROUTE):

A)      THE TIMING OF THE DELIVERY IS ESSENTIAL.  IT IS THE SINGLE MOST IMPORTANT ITEM TO SUCCESSFUL PASSING!

B)      GIVE THE RECEIVER 1 SECOND TO GET OUT OF HIS STANCE, AND 1/10 SECOND FOR EACH ADDITIONAL YARD RUN.  FOR EXAMPLE:  A 6 YARD “HITCH” SHOULD BE COMPLETED BY THE RECEIVER IN 1.6 SECONDS!  NOTE:  ON A TIMING ROUTE – THE RECEIVER MUST TAKE AT LEAST TWO MORE STEPS THAN THE QB DOES IN SETTING UP  (THIS GIVES THE QB .5 SECONDS TO GET THE BALL OUT).

C)      QUARTERBACK MUST GET THE BALL OUT OF HIS HAND (ON “TIMING ROUTES”) BEFORE THE RECEIVER MAKES HIS FINAL BREAK.  FOR EXAMPLE:  THE RECOMMENDED TIME FOR THE QB ON THE “HITCH” IS 1.3 SECONDS (IT HELPS ON ALL “TIMING” PASSES IF QB’S ARM COME UP INTO THROWING POSITION AS LAST STEP HITS THE GROUND).

D)      (QB)  IF YOU CANNOT CO-ORDINATE EYE AND ARM TO GET THE BALL AT IT’S INTENDED SPOT PROPERLY AND ON TIME, YOU ARE NOT A PASSER!!!

E)       KEEPING THE BALL IN BOTH HANDS AND CHEST HIGH IS PART OF THE ANSWER.

F)      “BREAKING POINTS”:  (FOR TIMING PURPOSES) – OBSERVE THE FOLLOWING (ON TIMING ROUTES):
1)      QB TAKES 3 STEPS (IN .8 SECOND) – ON PASSES WITH BREAKING POINTS OF 6 YARDS.  QB GETS THE BALL OUT IN 1.3.  The WR on the HITCH comes open at 1.6.