On USA Football: Combining two concepts into one for a more dynamic play

Please check out my iBooks for the iPad and Mac:  101+ Pro Style Pistol Offense Plays and The Zone Offense:  Create a Structured System.  The value in the enormous amount of content and detail is better than any coaching resource you can find anywhere else.  the interactivity and dynamic content work in a way that give you all the details to utilized the concepts being shared.  Each is also available by chapter (101+ and Zone Offense) and will soon be available for the iPhone and other devices.

On USA Football:

Synergy is combining multiple elements so that the result is greater than the sum of the the individual elements. The synergy principle applies to packaged plays in offense. In any packaged play, the quarterback is given both presnap and postsnap keys that help him determine which concept to distribute the ball to. The packaged plays concept has been around for a while. It became popular within the spread offense with the advent of the zone read-bubble play. The play packages the inside zone with a perimeter bubble screen, and the defense is forced to defend the entire field.

While this may seem like a great way to operate offense on every play, it takes plenty of repetition in order to create the synergistic effect. In general, it uses formation, a run or pass coupled with different run or pass to place stress on a single defender. When read correctly, the defender can’t be correct. It provides additional benefits in using tempo to attack the defense. The same concept can be used multiple times in a row while giving the appearance that a different play has been called. A prime example of this can be seen in the video below from the 2012 Ole’ Miss offense against Pitt. Ole’ Miss goes 49 yards in five plays using a packaged play with four options. Moving at a high tempo, they use all four options and score in 1:01…read more

Be sure to search my site for other articles and resources on packaged plays. Use the keywords “packaged plays” in the search box.

 

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On AFM: Pairing Zone Read and Power Read to Attack Across the Defensive Front

Get my new iBook, The Zone Offense:  Create a Structured System

The read game allows the offense to attack the defense where they become weakest based on post snap keys. The power read allows for a gap scheme read concept that attacks inside and outside in one direction at the same time. The zone option allows for an A-Gap to A-Gap inside run that can hit front side or cutback as well as attacking the perimeter opposite the inside zone. The personnel we use gives us a fullback, running back and a hybrid receiver/running back in the backfield along with a dynamic quarterback. As seen in the diagram below, just two play calls allow us to attack the entire front.

PR ZBO.001

Read more

Read about developing an offensive system in my new iBook The Zone Offense: Create a Structured System. Learn more about our pistol offense in 101+ Pro Style Pistol Offense Plays. Both are full of dynamic content – diagrams, animations, presentations and game video and are available for the iPad or Mac on the iBookstore. 

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Sweep Read play that attacks both perimeters

The realm of packaged plays just seems to keep expanding.  We have used a play that reads one edge and blocks the perimeter for jet sweep and has pin and pull blocking for the quarterback to keep and run sweep the opposite way.

The play is diagrammed below:

sweep sweep

 

In the first video, the QB sees the DE he is reading widen with the jet sweep, so he keeps it back the other way getting behind his pullers out on the perimeter.

The next clip show the end being blocked.  The running back was wrong on this play.  We wanted him to go to the perimeter.  His man was the defender that caused a fumble, but you can see how this play develops going to the jet sweep side.

This fit for us as part of a wildcat package with a dynamic quarterback.  It does provide another nice constraint play for the power read.

 

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Get my iBook 101+ Pro Style Pistol Offense Plays.  It provides concepts that can be utilized in any offense, not just the pistol. I have received some great feedback from coaches who adapted all or some of those ideas in 2013. Get 101+ PRO STYLE PISTOL OFFENSE PLAYS for your iPad or Mac from the iBookstore

 

Another Read Play?

Sweep trap

I was watching some cut-ups and came across a play that Colgate ran two years ago against Lafayette. I can’t know for sure if this was designed as a read play, but it made me think about the potential that it has as a read play.  In theory it would allow another hat on the edge on the sweep portion of the play, and it allows the quarterback to keep the ball inside running into a huge void if the linebacker flows to stop the sweep.  The tricky part would be the rules for the tight end who is leaving the defensive end alone and blocking the linebacker.  Theoretically, he would be blocking the backside linebacker as the frontside backer would be left as the player being read.  He would not necessarily need to get all the way back.  The frontside guard is pulling for the alley, and the backside guard is on a long trap course to the defensive end.  He would be aiming to kick him out.

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In the clip, the linebacker sits and the quarterback gives to the receiver in motion on the sweep.

sweep trap

If the linebacker flowed on sweep, he would keep and come off the down block of the tackle on the 3 technique.

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Another way to block this sweep/trap read play would be to block down on the end with the TE, block to the BSLB with the tackle, and trap the 3 tech.  It might clean up any confusion as to who the TE would be blocking.  However, the path would be tighter for the quarterback, and the decision would have to be made quicker.

If the objective is to get a hat on a hat on the edge, and change up the Power Read fits for the defense, then this may have some potential as a constraint play.  Colgate only ran it one time in the game, so it may have been exactly that for them as well.

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Get my iBook 101+ Pro Style Pistol Offense Plays.  It provides concepts that can be utilized in any offense, not just the pistol. I have received some great feedback from coaches who adapted all or some of those ideas in 2013. Get 101+ PRO STYLE PISTOL OFFENSE PLAYS for your iPad or Mac from the iBookstore

Quick/Naked from the +3 for TD

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http://www.playmakerpro.com

In the 2013 Stagg Bowl game, Whitewater called a quick/naked play on 3rd & goal from the 3.  The QB looked left for the quick out, pump faked and rolled to the right.  The h-back in a wing to the left, the slot to the right and the wide receiver on the line were running a flood type of concept. The defense actually had it covered pretty well which should leave the run to the QB as the only option left.  However, the wide receiver runs a route that is very tough to defend.  He shows that he is going to he corner of the end zone for a fade (which he caught earlier for a TD).  At about 7 yards deep into the end zone he plants and breaks straight down to the front pylon.  The QB makes a perfect throw for the TD.

The timing of the play with the QB execute a pump fake to the left and rolling right helps this route, as does the rest of the routes in the concept because the other defenders are covering other routes and there is no one to get under the route coming down to the front pylon.

Read more on quick/naked here and here.

Here’s the video:

http://espn.go.com/video/clip?id=espn:10174573

My iBook 101+ Pro Style Pistol Offense Plays provides concepts that can be utilized in any offense, not just the pistol. The interactive multimedia book contains 229 pieces of dynamic content and q total of 30 minutes of game film.  I have received some great feedback from coaches who adapted all or some of those ideas in 2013. Get 101+ PRO STYLE PISTOL OFFENSE PLAYS for your iPad or Mac from the iBookstore

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Packaged Plays Resources

Packaged plays have started to become a staple in many offenses.  The Auburn win over Alabama highlighted how a packaged play can devastate a defense.  Packaged plays are becoming a hot topic over the past couple of seasons, and more and more resources are becoming available.  This post provides a listing of resources for your off season research.
 
I have written several articles on this topic:
 
 
Chris Brown loves this topic and has been writing about it for a while now.

http://www.grantland.com/story/_/id/8287610/

 
 
Several Clinic Articles have been written about different types of packaged plays:
Packaged plays have really taken off at the college level:
 
 
 

My iBook 101+ Pro Style Pistol Offense Plays provides concepts that can be utilized in any offense, not just the pistol. I have received some great feedback from coaches who adapted all or some of those ideas in 2013. Get 101+ PRO STYLE PISTOL OFFENSE PLAYS for your iPad or Mac from the iBookstore

Packaged Plays: Auburn’s TD Pass with :32 to go

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With a rare game ending 109 yard field goal return, what seems to be getting lost in the shuffle is the touchdown that tied it up for Auburn with :32 seconds left.  The play was a run-pass option off of an inside zone read.

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The run concept is something made popular by Chris Ault at Nevada, and is becoming more and more popular as the zone option is taking root in the NFL.  Chris Brown writes about it here.  The concept is called “Bluff” by Ault.  A fullback or h-back is responsible for bluffing a kick out block on the end, who is also being read by the quarterback for give or keep.  The FB/HB continues past the end and becomes a lead blocker for the quarterback as seen in the video below.

The play with the addition of the pass component is not new.  Pitt used this play in 2012.

It is legal as long as there are no ineligible receivers farther than 3 yards down field.  On a keep read, the quarterback sprints toward the edge and has a run pass option.  If the corner is playing a cover two technique or if the corner fills on the run, then the receiver runs a fade and the quarterback hits him in the void between the corner and the safety, which is exactly what Marshall did for Auburn.

The play is another example of a packaged play with multiple post snap options based on defender keys.  Read more about packaged plays:

Musical Chairs: Packaged Plays and the Evolution of “Option” Football 

The Total Package

The Stick Draw Concept

I will post more links to packaged plays later today.

My iBook 101+ Pro Style Pistol Offense Plays provides concepts that can be utilized in any offense, not just the pistol. I have received some great feedback from coaches who adapted all or some of those ideas in 2013. Get 101+ PRO STYLE PISTOL OFFENSE PLAYS for your iPad or Mac from the iBookstore