On USA Football : Stressing dual responsibility defenders with play action

On USA Football:

During the last several posts, we have discussed establishing a base play, using formations, developing multiple pass concepts and creating counters off of the base play. A fully rounded attacked will include effective play action passes off of the base plays and counters.

We have several passing actions built off of our entire run game. This article will focus on how we pair our run game with a boundary flood concept. This is a single illustration. Within our system, we have created a structure that allows us to marry any run concept with any dropback concept. Our mode of play calling involves using wristbands. Previously, we used code words, but we felt that we wanted to be very clear in communicating what we want. While a play call may seem wordy at times, only certain blocks of the information speak to certain players. This mode can be done without wristbands as well. This will be a topic in future articles.

Stressing dual responsibility defenders

One advantage we have in this method is that we stress dual action defenders to the maximum. In giving a full run fake, a linebacker or safety who must respect the run first is given nothing but a run key from the entire interior of the offense. Read more

Learn more on this topic with interactive presentations and game video in 101+ Pro Style Pistol Offense Plays

Only interested in the chapter on Play Action?  Get it here for $4.99.

My book that gives every detail by position to run the stretch play (10.3 yd average) and details on structuring any offensive system is The Zone Offense:  Create A Structured System is also available for the iPad and Mac.

 

 

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Base Plays, Constraint Plays, and Series Football

I love studying old football books. Though we think that this idea or that idea is cutting edge in football, you see that the coaches from the past had similar ideas. The game just evolves so that what we see on the field looks revolutionary, but really that idea existed somewhere in the past. For example, I found a video on the internet of the ball being snapped in three seconds. This was before the days of helmets, but even, some kind of communication system had to exist to let the players know what to do on that particular play.

In reading through Tiger Ellison’s Run and Shoot Football -The Now Attack, I read a section that seems to be a topic of interest:

Definition of Run and Shoot
…We made every pass look like a run and every run look like a pass. Offenses that pass from a pocket split their attack into two phases-their running game and their passing game. The setting up of the quarterback in the pocket screams “Pass” to every defender on the field. Even though pocket-passing teams often fake the ball to a runner before setting up in the pocket, still the fake wards off detection for only a moment, after which all defenders spring into anti-aircraft action. The Run and Shoot offense did not split its attack–it was just one game, running and passing performed anywhere anytime with no distinguishing clue to signal run or pass.

Whether we are talking packaged plays in which the offense is either running or passing based on a pre or post snap key, or whether we are talking “constraint” plays which look like and work off of a base play Tiger Ellison’s philosophy of attacking a defense holds true today. The concepts and schemes we use may be different, but the philosophy is the same.

For more on base plays read my post on USA Football.

For more on Constraint Plays
Joe Daniels
Chris Brown

For more on packaged plays check out my resources link.

My iBook 101+ Pro Style Pistol Offense Plays uses a similar philosophy as that described as Ellison in creating a run game and pass game that look the same.

A Plan to Break Down Defensive Frontal Structures

Bill Mountjoy is an authority not just on how to run the ball but also on when and where to run the ball.  This post from an email from Bill provides great information on how to use run schemes.  Thanks again Coach!

The document below describes the Red-White System.  Coach Mountjoy’s notes are written after the document.

Reedwhite1redwhite2redwhite3redwhite4redwhite5redwhite6

We still find IZ GOOD to the “White” side of the defense (see ATTACHMENT).  Can use it with or without “H” back ISO on it.

ALSO:  Check below:

CALLING RUNS:

 RED:

  1. “POWER”
  1. “OUTSIDE ZONE”
  1. “TOSS”  (ESP. IF MAN/BLITZ)

WHITE:

  1. “COUNTER”
  1. “INSIDE ZONE”
  1. “TOSS” (ESP. IF MAN/BLITZ)

ALSO:  “H-AROUND” (PRIORITIES IN ORDER):

A)    IF 3 MEN TO SE SIDE OF BALL AWAY FROM “TRIPS” – RUN TO SE SIDE.  IF 4 MEN TO SE SIDE OF BALL FROM “TRIPS ” – GO TO PLAN B):

B)  IF 4 MEN TO EACH SIDE OF BALL IN “DOUBLE” – RUN TO TE SIDE.

“LEAD DRAW”  TO EITHER SIDE.

A)     POWER/COUNTER:

RED SIDE (TE SIDE IN THIS CASE) WE CAN RUN THERE ON POWER VS. 4 IN THE “BOX” STRONGSIDE OF THE CENTER (with H coming in motion) – BUT NOT 5:
WE FEEL that since there will be a smaller HOLE between the 3 technique & the 7 tech. DE to be kicked out on the “POWER” to the TE side (by align) – the “H” in MOTION can get ONTO the block MUCH quicker than the OFF G would on the Counter (before the hole constricts). ALSO: In “DOUBLE” – if you ran Power to SE side – WHO is the kickout blocker??? REMEMBER: If they are WEAK on the SE side, with 3 defenders or less in the “box” – EXPLOIT IT (don’t bring another defender over WITH the motion, because we don’t like to run to the SE side with 4 defenders in the “box”).

WHITE SIDE (SE SIDE IN THIS CASE) WE CAN RUN THERE WITH 3 IN THE “BOX” WEAKSIDE OF THE CENTER ON COUNTER (with wrapping OFF G coming) – BUT NOT 4:
The HOLE on the SE side between the 1 or Shade & the loose 5 tech. DE to be trapped on the COUNTER is generally wider (by align) – taking the trapping Off G more time to get there, & if the DE DOES close too fast – we can “TANGO” block him on Counter to the WHITE side (which you CAN’T do on the Power towards RED).

Using the SEQUENCE of motioning to POWER the TE side, & coming back with COUNTER to the SE side (WHEN they over react to motion) is almost an entire offense in itself (along with the play actions). Having used these plays in this manner since 1982 – I can ASSURE you that it is what works best for US!!! We don’t get “carried away” & try to do too many things. You might call us “minimalists”, & our philosophy is “LESS IS BETTER”!!!.

Larry Beightol says that:
1. We only run Power to the TE side, AND, then only to the RIGHT!!
2. We only run Counter to the SE side, AND, then only to the LEFT!!!

His ONLY REASON??? (QUOTE) “EVEN IN THE NFL – there is not ENOUGH TIME to teach the COUNTER to the TE side AND the SE side, AND to the right and left, AND ALSO, NOT enough time teach the POWER to the TE side AND the SE side, AND to the right and left. We have to leave time for our OTHER runs, AND, Pass Pro”!!!

B)     ZONE PLAYS:

We prefer INSIDE ZONE to the “WHITE” side because the RB has a chance to CRAM the B Gap (because of the “bubble” over the ON G) without having to always make a CUT (“the BEST cut is NO cut”), & because we frequently get 3 double teams on the IZ to the “White” side:

GETTING 3 “VERTICAL” DOUBLE TEAMS ON INSIDE ZONE PLAY TO “WHITE” SIDE:

OBJECTIVE:  PUSH LEVEL 1 (DLM) BACK INTO THE LAPS OF LEVEL 2 (LBers)

—————————-W/S

C———————————————-S/S———–C

——————–W——-M——S

———————–E—–N—T—-E

———————-O-O-O-C-O-O-O

O—————————–Q—————————–O

——————————-R

INSIDE ZONE LEFT:

LE & LT = (ZONE) DOUBLE DE (#2) TO WLB (#3)

LG & CTR = (ZONE) DOUBLE NOSE (#0) TO MLB (#1)

RG & RT = (ZONE) DOUBLE DT (#1) TO SLB (#2)

RE = (MAN) CUTOFF DE (#3)

RB = 1st. STEP LATERAL WITH PLAYSIDE FOOT, ROLL, CROSSOVER, AND AIM NOSE FOR OUTSIDE LEG OF LG.   CRAM B GAP

QB = OPEN TO 7 O’CLOCK.  AFTER HANDOFF – FAKED NAKED FOR 5 STEPS AWAY FROM P.O.A.

WR’S  “PUSH/CRACK” FROM CORNERS TO SAFETIES

We prefer OUTSIDE ZONE to the “RED” side of the defense because the RB’s SECOND read (his first read – the DE – normally gives his a read to go inside) is generally a 3 technique (on “Red”) as opposed to a “1” or a “Shade” (on “White”), and he can make his decision to cut UP quicker off the 3 tech. (& more straight upfield).  On  “Red” he has a greater chance to cram the C Gap (because of the “bubble” over the ON T) – which is what we WANT!

The BIGGEST MISTAKE I see offensive coaches make it that they (in a given game) try to run ALL their plays, from ALL their formations, & run them ALL both right & left (& run them ALL to both “RED” & “WHITE”). That is a recipe for “getting your ass beat”.