Our Library is Full of Cutting Edge Football Coaching Resources

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Quick Hitters:  Information on one specific topic. $5.99-9.99

The Quick Hitter allows a coach to find information on a very narrow topic.  The coaches sharing this topic still provide great detail.  The Quick Hitters will be valuable tools for a coach looking for specific ideas.  This type of information is useful both the off season as well as during the season.  As we build our library, we will incorporate a cutting edge search tool allowing a coach to get the exact resource he needs to solve a problem or improve a certain aspect of his own system.  The Quick Hitter gives you the critical information you need right now.

The Squeeze Concept iPad  more info

Marrying Stick and Zone Bubble (an RPO) iPad   iPhone  Google Play  more info

Something to Hang Your Hat on Inside Zone  iPad  more info

101+ Pro Style Pistol Offense Plays:  Play Action iPad iPhone More Info

101+ Pro Style Pistol Offense Plays: Pin & Pull Sweep iPad More Info

The Zone Offense-Define the System and Build the Foundation  iPad more info

The Zone Offense-Develop the Fundamentals  iPad more info

The Zone Offense-Structure a Starting Point and Develop Coaching Methods   iPad more info


F.A.S.T. Manuals (will be sold for $4.99) download our first one free!

FOCUSED ATTACK STRATEGIES & TACTICS

At Coaches Edge Technologies, we are revolutionizing the coaching education market by producing information on a cutting edge platform. We do not want our innovation to stop there.  In today’s information age, being able to find answers and ideas and then incorporate those into an existing system is of paramount importance. In order to aid coaches in finding detailed and relevant information, we continue to create a distinguished product line.  We continue to produce our author series manuals.  This type of product has been the standard in coaching education for many years, but our new, state-of-the-art, digitally enhanced format provides a more thorough, easy-to-understand analysis of how systems, concepts, and new ideas can be successfully incorporated.  The Coaches Edge Author Series Manuals provide an unrivaled amount of content for a coach to study. At Coaches Edge we realize that coaches need a different way to find, consume and interact with information.  Coaches must be able to get detailed answers that cut to the core of what makes the answers successful.  Therefore, we created two product lines that enable a coach to tailor his research.  The F.A.S.T. Manual and the Quick Hitterprovide a new and more relevant way for coaches to interact with coaching info. The F.A.S.T. (Focused Attack Strategies and Tactics) Manual Series goes beyond teaching the concept to presenting the application of strategies and tactics.  Understanding a concept is one thing.  Being able to experience a coach’s though process in using his system is another.  This type of information is not only useful in off season research, it provides a coach an easily consumed piece for week to week research and review of tactics that his team may need to use during the season. For example, if it’s a certain formation against a certain defense, or a specific blitz scheme against a pass protection, our library can provide the answers. The Quick Hitter Series provides the coach with ideas on a single focused topic.  This might be a certain route, run concept, defensive pressure, special teams scheme, or in-game procedure or tempo. Though the amount of content presented is equivalent to a chapter from an author series manual, the depth and detail remain. Coaches Edge is committed to utilizing innovative ways to provide coaches the interaction they need to assimilate ideas into their coaching. F.A.S.T. Manual: 15 Personnel Power Package “15” meaning 5 TE (and h-back type), 1 running back (the wildcat) are utilized to create an effective short yardage and goal line package as well as a nice open field change-up. The coaches thought process in analyzing strengths and weaknesses, planning for adjustments and creating opportunities is shared in text and video.  Application of the plan is illustrated with multi-angle game footage and voice over analysis and telestration.  All raw cut-ups are included for the readers own review and study.

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get it here for the iPad/Mac

get it here for iPhone

get it on Google Play (Window, Android and iPhone)


Author Series 

The Author Series presents volumes of work by our coaches. This is where you will get very detailed information designed to allow you to master the material and utilize it within your own system.  Our coaches back hours of video, hundreds of diagrams, interactive presentations, diagrams, and of course text into each manual.  If there is an idea you want to implement, these manuals give you what you need

Herring Snippet Covers.001

Explosive Offense:  Manufacturing Vertical Shots iPad  More Info

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Quick Rhythm Option Routes iPad   More Info

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101+ Read Game Plays    iPad   More Info

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Targeted Attack:  Using Tempo As a Weapon  iPad   More Info

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RPO (Run Pass Option)  iPad   More InfoBlue Print Cover DG.001

The Blue Print   iPad   Google Play   More Info

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The Need for Change  iPad   IPhone  Google Play   More Info

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Core Drills For Developing Football Kicking Skill  iPad   More Info

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The Zone Offense:  Create a Structured System  iPad   More Info 

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101+ Pro Style Pistol Offense Plays  iPad   More Info

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Pass Protection from No TE Formations  iPad

Another Quick Hitter: Inside Zone

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Something to Hang Your Hat On:  Inside Zone by Justin Iske

Justin Iske shares the details of their inside zone play including diagrams against different fronts and variations to make the play very multiple.  Everyday drills are shared in video.  Plays are telestrated on video with coaching points and assignments.

The detail that Coach Iske puts into this Coaches Edge Technologies Quick Hitter allows a coach to have the information he needs to install this play.

Get it here for your iPad. $5.99

Our other Quick Hitter:

Formaz cover

Just $5.99.  Get it here for your iPad or Mac.

$5.99 Get it here for your iPhone.

$6.15 Get it here for Windows or your Android device.

Our first Quick Hitter comes from the Co-Offensive Coordinators at Ohio Wesleyan University.  Their concept of pairing zone read bubble with stick and reading a second level defender proved to be a successful way to utilize their non-mobile quarterback.  Formaz and Ward share the details of their concept and include 16 multi-angle game cut-ups to illustrate the multiple options within this play.

A State Champion Coach on using Coaches Edge Game Planning System

“The most valuable resource we have as coaches during game weeks is time – and this resource helped me completely re-imagine how I can best spend it.  By taking the process of planning and scripting and automating it, this tool will allow me to be more efficient in how I work, and most importantly, leave me more time and headspace to be fully present with my kids during our preparations.”

Andrew Coverdale
Offensive Coordinator
Trinity High School
Louisville, Kentucky
2014 6A State Champion

The system is adjustable to create any mix of run or pass ratio you wish to have in practice.  Once you make the decisions about what you want in your game plan, enter it in the “game plan board” and the rest of the work is completed for you.  Practice scripts, call sheets , and a quarterback wristband are generated for you.  You save a minimum of 8 hours per week and have the confidence that you gave your offense enough work to be ready for the situations they will face.

Also included are printable work sheets for your game plan preparation, as well as a post game report for quality control.

Read about the process here.

All of this is available to you for just $99 one time.  You do  not have to subscribe to yearly.  Get it here:

http://www.americanfootballmonthly.com/coachesedge/

CE GPS.002

Drop the Bomb on Opposing Defenses

GET IT HERE FOR YOUR iPAD or MAC

Foreword

Explosive plays matter.  Other than turnovers, explosive plays are typically cited as the single statistic that is the best predictor of wins.  Good offenses generate explosive plays.  A common saying among spread coaches is “throw short to people who score.” While we certainly agree with this statement in par; unless we have an incredible talent advantage, it is difficult to be explosive if we only throw short.  Some years we have fast receivers.  Some years we don’t.  Some years we have receivers who can make things happen after the catch.  Some years we don’t.  As offensive coaches we have to make sure that we give our players a chance to make plays down the field.  To do this we have to find ways to manufacture vertical throws.  By using the term “manufacture” it should be pointed out that these ideas are created through play design, not simply by saying, “Johnny, you are faster than everyone else…go deep.”  While that tactic also has its merits, and we have been blessed on occasion with that type of player, it is not the norm for us.  When we create opportunities to attack vertically, not only can explosive plays be generated, but these down-the-field shots protect the rest of our offense.  Safeties and corners can no longer be as aggressive in run support or in robbing short patterns and eliminating quick underneath completions.

In a previous work for Coaches Edge Technologies entitled Quick Rhythm Option RoutesI discussed in great detail two routes packages we feel are cutting edge and applicable to many different offensive systems.  Both packages are ball-control passes that can get the ball out quickly but also provide the potential for big plays.  We will look at a variety of methods we have used to engineer explosive passes.  These passes are designed to create explosive play opportunities every time they are called, not just in the hope of the defense missing a tackle or a receiver making a great run after a catch.  The hope is that even when they are unsuccessful, these ideas can still put a defense on its heels.

Josh Herring

Introduction and Philosophy

In 2007 I fondly recall our team throwing the ball all over the field on nearly every snap.  We had a record-breaking quarterback who was a four-year starter and a veteran, physical offensive line.  We had two outstanding receivers who both went over 1,000 yards receiving, complemented by numerous role players who could block and catch the football.  Over 50% of our passing game was three-step gun dropback passing, often down the field with intermediate and vertical throws.  At that time, in rural North Alabama, very few teams threw the ball more than ten times a game.  Coverages were extremely basic.  A jailbreak screen had a high likelihood of scoring if called in any given passing situation.  For a “passing team” those were the days.  Things have changed.  Currently (at least in our state), most high school coaches have more time with their kids than college coaches.  Most teams practice all summer after a ten-practice spring training period.  High school teams participate in off campus OTAs with other teams during the summer which closely resemble the NFL training camp model.  Defensive tactics have advanced at an alarming rate.  In a given season we will typically see the following:  base 4-2, 4-3, 3-3, and 3-4 fronts (often with multiple combinations in the same game), blitzes not just from inside and outside linebackers but cornerbacks and safeties, and a dizzying array of pass coverages, including complex split-field combo coverages like those favored by the University of Alabama and TCU.  Pass rushes are better.  Defensive backs are better.  Blitz schemes are more exotic.  Coverage schemes are sounder, better taught, and refined through countless repetitions in summer 7-on-7 competitions.  Against better competition, if we intend to dropback pass 30 or more times a game…our QB is in for a very sore Saturday morning.

We want to create explosive down-the-field plays in the passing game like everyone else.  However, we have had to find numerous new ways to get those throws while keeping our QB off of his back.  We came to the realization several years ago after an up and down offensive season and numerous conversations with college and high school coaches, that we had to make some adaptations to our offense. Simply put, defenses were often willing to concede short throws on quick game and screens.  We began to face talented defenses that were willing to play a conservative base front that maintained overhang players on both sides and played soft coverage with a “don’t give up big plays” philosophy.  Going into a game, they had decided to force us into a “constraint” offense.  Constraint plays are plays which protect the base offense and serve as “counters.”  In discussing this problem with other coaches, we found that many of them were facing the same issues.  As an example, while much less common now than at the advent of the up-tempo spread era, here is a common case study in which the defense controls offensive tactics rather than the other way around:

Team A was almost exclusively a 2×2, 10 personnel spread team. When they started spreading people out, they found that it emptied the box, and they could run zone read effectively.  They had a very basic passing game and protected their read option running game with bubble screens.  Team B was good on defense.  They played a 4-3 Cover 2/4 defense.  They apexed their outside linebackers to collapse on the zone read and still stressed the passing game.  The outside linebackers were athletic and could cover.  When Team A threw bubbles and quick game to constrain the outside linebackers, Team B was in cover 2 and take it away.  When Team A became frustrated, they tried to throw four verticals.  Team B converted from cover 2 to cover 4 due to their read system and matched all four vertical patterns.  Team A could find no rhythm on offense.  They moved the ball at times but had difficulty creating explosive plays.  Team B was perfectly content in allowing Team A to throw bubble screens for 4 yard gains.  In the red zone, Team B clamped down time after time and ended up winning a close game. 

In a clinic talk in 2009, I heard Mark Hudspeth remark that he had learned that a spread team, if always in a 10 personnel 2×2 spread look, is giving the defense the best of both worlds.  They can rally 7 and perhaps even 9 defenders against the run and drop 7 into coverage.  By relying only on box counts (or to use a more current innovation as an example – run pass combos), the defense can often dictate.  We believe there is a lot of truth to this.  We don’t want to be forced to check the ball down all game.  While our enthusiasm about run-pass combos is as devoted as anyone’s, there are times when we need “attitude” plays even as a spread offense.  We want to attack on every snap, whether in the run or pass game.  One of the things we hope to show is that teams which operate in a spread environment can use simple tweaks such as tight-end /wing sets and multiple personnel to benefit the rest of their offense without being overly complex.  For instance, it can be surprising how defenses respond to a two back set when playing a “passing team.”  We might even be in 10 personnel, but simply by aligning with a receiver in the backfield, we may automatically check to an 8 man front.

We are committed to trying to take a minimum of two downfield attempts per quarter.  In our way of thinking, down-the-field throws are constraint plays like screens.  We must throw them even when they are not working, because even when they aren’t working….they are.  Even unsuccessful screens can tire out a defensive line and make defenders run from sideline to sideline.  In a similar way, attacking downfield makes defensive backs (and coordinators) nervous.  Even an attempt that falls incomplete can create space for the short to intermediate passing game and make fast-filling safeties hesitate just a little more before committing to the run.

As a “spread” offense we have realized that changing personnel and/or using “pro-style” formations does not mean we have to change anything about our philosophy or scheme.  We are not going to be “put in a box” as to our style of offense.  While the ideas here are going to be shown as applied in a spread environment, most of them are applicable in any offense.  We have divided our deep ball package into a variety of categories.  Some are “attitude” plays where we are attempting to assert our authority and dictate to the defense.  Others are constraint plays that protect other parts of our offense.  We should note that in no way is this work a comprehensive study in attacking vertically down the field.  We certainly are not arguing that any of these methods are the best way to take deep shots.  The best way is what works for you.  Instead, we will look at applications within our offense and the thought processes that led to them.  Hopefully this will provoke thinking and reflection about how your own offense can adapt to attack vertically.

Our hope is that in presenting our philosophy and methods, you can find something of use for your offense, regardless of system.

Live on iPad/Mac Explosive Offense: Manufacturing Vertical Shots

Herring Snippet Covers.001

GET IT HERE FOR YOUR iPAD or MAC

Description

Josh Herring presents a dynamic look at the philosophy, thought process, and strategy behind engineering explosive opportunities in the passing game.  Though Herring operates from a spread environment, he shows how to utilize tight ends or receivers positioned as tight ends and h-backs to create advantages.  These concepts apply to any offensive.  This is a valuable resource for any football coach at any level.

Foreword

Explosive plays matter.  Other than turnovers, explosive plays are typically cited as the single statistic that is the best predictor of wins.  Good offenses generate explosive plays.  A common saying among spread coaches is “throw short to people who score.” While we certainly agree with this statement in par; unless we have an incredible talent advantage, it is difficult to be explosive if we only throw short.  Some years we have fast receivers.  Some years we don’t.  Some years we have receivers who can make things happen after the catch.  Some years we don’t.  As offensive coaches we have to make sure that we give our players a chance to make plays down the field.  To do this we have to find ways to manufacture vertical throws.  By using the term “manufacture” it should be pointed out that these ideas are created through play design, not simply by saying, “Johnny, you are faster than everyone else…go deep.”  While that tactic also has its merits, and we have been blessed on occasion with that type of player, it is not the norm for us.  When we create opportunities to attack vertically, not only can explosive plays be generated, but these down-the-field shots protect the rest of our offense.  Safeties and corners can no longer be as aggressive in run support or in robbing short patterns and eliminating quick underneath completions.

In a previous work for Coaches Edge Technologies entitled Quick Rhythm Option Routes, I discussed in great detail two routes packages we feel are cutting edge and applicable to many different offensive systems.  Both packages are ball-control passes that can get the ball out quickly but also provide the potential for big plays.  We will look at a variety of methods we have used to engineer explosive passes.  These passes are designed to create explosive play opportunities every time they are called, not just in the hope of the defense missing a tackle or a receiver making a great run after a catch.  The hope is that even when they are unsuccessful, these ideas can still put a defense on its heels.

Josh Herring

Introduction and Philosophy

In 2007 I fondly recall our team throwing the ball all over the field on nearly every snap.  We had a record-breaking quarterback who was a four-year starter and a veteran, physical offensive line.  We had two outstanding receivers who both went over 1,000 yards receiving, complemented by numerous role players who could block and catch the football.  Over 50% of our passing game was three-step gun dropback passing, often down the field with intermediate and vertical throws.  At that time, in rural North Alabama, very few teams threw the ball more than ten times a game.  Coverages were extremely basic.  A jailbreak screen had a high likelihood of scoring if called in any given passing situation.  For a “passing team” those were the days.  Things have changed.  Currently (at least in our state), most high school coaches have more time with their kids than college coaches.  Most teams practice all summer after a ten-practice spring training period.  High school teams participate in off campus OTAs with other teams during the summer which closely resemble the NFL training camp model.  Defensive tactics have advanced at an alarming rate.  In a given season we will typically see the following:  base 4-2, 4-3, 3-3, and 3-4 fronts (often with multiple combinations in the same game), blitzes not just from inside and outside linebackers but cornerbacks and safeties, and a dizzying array of pass coverages, including complex split-field combo coverages like those favored by the University of Alabama and TCU.  Pass rushes are better.  Defensive backs are better.  Blitz schemes are more exotic.  Coverage schemes are sounder, better taught, and refined through countless repetitions in summer 7-on-7 competitions.  Against better competition, if we intend to dropback pass 30 or more times a game…our QB is in for a very sore Saturday morning.

We want to create explosive down-the-field plays in the passing game like everyone else.  However, we have had to find numerous new ways to get those throws while keeping our QB off of his back.  We came to the realization several years ago after an up and down offensive season and numerous conversations with college and high school coaches, that we had to make some adaptations to our offense. Simply put, defenses were often willing to concede short throws on quick game and screens.  We began to face talented defenses that were willing to play a conservative base front that maintained overhang players on both sides and played soft coverage with a “don’t give up big plays” philosophy.  Going into a game, they had decided to force us into a “constraint” offense.  Constraint plays are plays which protect the base offense and serve as “counters.”  In discussing this problem with other coaches, we found that many of them were facing the same issues.  As an example, while much less common now than at the advent of the up-tempo spread era, here is a common case study in which the defense controls offensive tactics rather than the other way around:

Team A was almost exclusively a 2×2, 10 personnel spread team. When they started spreading people out, they found that it emptied the box, and they could run zone read effectively.  They had a very basic passing game and protected their read option running game with bubble screens.  Team B was good on defense.  They played a 4-3 Cover 2/4 defense.  They apexed their outside linebackers to collapse on the zone read and still stressed the passing game.  The outside linebackers were athletic and could cover.  When Team A threw bubbles and quick game to constrain the outside linebackers, Team B was in cover 2 and take it away.  When Team A became frustrated, they tried to throw four verticals.  Team B converted from cover 2 to cover 4 due to their read system and matched all four vertical patterns.  Team A could find no rhythm on offense.  They moved the ball at times but had difficulty creating explosive plays.  Team B was perfectly content in allowing Team A to throw bubble screens for 4 yard gains.  In the red zone, Team B clamped down time after time and ended up winning a close game. 

In a clinic talk in 2009, I heard Mark Hudspeth remark that he had learned that a spread team, if always in a 10 personnel 2×2 spread look, is giving the defense the best of both worlds.  They can rally 7 and perhaps even 9 defenders against the run and drop 7 into coverage.  By relying only on box counts (or to use a more current innovation as an example – run pass combos), the defense can often dictate.  We believe there is a lot of truth to this.  We don’t want to be forced to check the ball down all game.  While our enthusiasm about run-pass combos is as devoted as anyone’s, there are times when we need “attitude” plays even as a spread offense.  We want to attack on every snap, whether in the run or pass game.  One of the things we hope to show is that teams which operate in a spread environment can use simple tweaks such as tight-end /wing sets and multiple personnel to benefit the rest of their offense without being overly complex.  For instance, it can be surprising how defenses respond to a two back set when playing a “passing team.”  We might even be in 10 personnel, but simply by aligning with a receiver in the backfield, we may automatically check to an 8 man front.

We are committed to trying to take a minimum of two downfield attempts per quarter.  In our way of thinking, down-the-field throws are constraint plays like screens.  We must throw them even when they are not working, because even when they aren’t working….they are.  Even unsuccessful screens can tire out a defensive line and make defenders run from sideline to sideline.  In a similar way, attacking downfield makes defensive backs (and coordinators) nervous.  Even an attempt that falls incomplete can create space for the short to intermediate passing game and make fast-filling safeties hesitate just a little more before committing to the run.

As a “spread” offense we have realized that changing personnel and/or using “pro-style” formations does not mean we have to change anything about our philosophy or scheme.  We are not going to be “put in a box” as to our style of offense.  While the ideas here are going to be shown as applied in a spread environment, most of them are applicable in any offense.  We have divided our deep ball package into a variety of categories.  Some are “attitude” plays where we are attempting to assert our authority and dictate to the defense.  Others are constraint plays that protect other parts of our offense.  We should note that in no way is this work a comprehensive study in attacking vertically down the field.  We certainly are not arguing that any of these methods are the best way to take deep shots.  The best way is what works for you.  Instead, we will look at applications within our offense and the thought processes that led to them.  Hopefully this will provoke thinking and reflection about how your own offense can adapt to attack vertically.

Our hope is that in presenting our philosophy and methods, you can find something of use for your offense, regardless of system.

Last Day $20 on Coach Gonzalez interactive books

Dan Gonzalez RZ

$20 Clinic from home this weekend! Available on all devices.  

You get hours of video. The diagrams,video tutorials, multi-angle cut-ups, and interactive learning tools in these interactive books are designed specifically for this format.

Take advantage of this opportunity to get cutting edge coaching resources.

Dan Gonzalez’s Series:  Developing an Offensive System.  You get 3 hours of video total in Coach Gonzalez’s books.

Part 1 – The Need for Change (1 hour of video)

for iPad/Mac

for iPhone

for Windows/Android Devices

Part 2 – The Blue Print (2 hours of video)

for iPad/Mac

for Windows/Android Devices

Also available:   Dictate to the defense.  The recording of Coach Gonzalez’s webinar which was over 2 hours long.  $25.

Get it here

Coming Soon on all devices: Manufacturing Vertical Shots

Herring Snippet Covers.001

Manufacturing Vertical Shots by Josh Herring is the second volume in his series:  Rapid Precision Offense.  Herring’s first volume Quick Rhythm Option Routes is an outstanding coaching resource for any offense.  He includes ways to include the routes into many concepts from multiple formations.  He also illustrates using quick option routes packaged with runs to create run-pass options.

Through his works Josh Herring has shown he is a bright football mind.  Check out his first iBook.  It will definitely have you excited to see the new one.  Both volumes include over 2 1/2 hours of video.  Like all Coaches Edge products it is full of the details you need to implement the concept now.

From Herring’s Quick Rhythm Option Routes

Introduction of Quick Rhythm Option Routes by Josh Herring

Slot Option with Run Combo (an RPO)

The “Dodge” concept

From Quick Rhythm Option Routes Ch1: “Sloppy” (Slot Option)

Through text, 68 diagrams, 20 instructional videos, and 72 game video cut-ups, Herring gives all the details necessary to install the quick rhythm option passing game.  These concepts can fit into any offensive system and enhance receiver abilities.  With the details provided, these concepts can be added to a system to create a high percentage passing game with explosive opportunities. Video totals over 2 hours and 30 minutes.

I am excited about what Coach Herring has produced with Coaches Edge Technologies.  This is something every offensive coordinator needs to see.  These high percentage, yet explosive routes can be implemented into any offense.  With over 2.5 hours of instructional video and play analysis, Herring gives you the details you need to implement these concepts.  Included in the “Further Review” section are over 70 cut-ups which can be viewed in regular speed and slow forward/reverse as well. Below is the Foreword by Dan Gonzalez.

Here’s what Dan has to say about Quick Rhythm Option Routes by Josh Herring.

I met Josh several years ago, as we shared our viewpoint on the passing game.  I immediately sensed that he was truly a student of the game – not just concerned with the “X’s and O’s” of football plays, but with the individual details that make these plays come to life.   With that common ground, we struck up a friendship, and have exchanged ideas ever since.   I can honestly say that Coach Herring is my favorite kind of coach – one who strives for continuous improvement, rather than resting on the laurels of one or two or three or five good statistical seasons.  He’s dedicated to his craft, and is always improving his methods of teaching.  So, when Keith Grabowski asked me about potential authors for iBooks, Josh was at the very top of the list.

Quick Rhythm Option Routes represents a very pertinent, essential topic for coaches at all levels.  With the exception of the highest levels of college football, most teams only have one or two true receiving threats.  Further, few teams have a sure fire breakaway threat.  Coach Herring illustrates for us, in great detail, how a team cannot only survive but thrive in the passing game under such circumstances.  Not only does this work cover the basic option routes that are perhaps covered on the clinic circuit, but provides the basis for an entire series from which to base a passing game.

The technical detail and video illustration that accompany the text and diagrams are second to none; the reader will feel like a participant in one of Josh’s quarterback meetings.  With over two hours of video, not to mention the raw video footage provided as a reference tool, coaches will be armed with everything they need to not only implement into their system, but troubleshoot coaching points and counter defensive tactics as well.  Oftentimes, clinic attendees are left to their own devices as they install; not so with this work.

No longer can a coach simply throw their hands up and say “we can’t get open” – no matter what level of talent, a competent player should be able to gain leverage to receive a pass.  In other words, a 4.8 receiver can beat a 4.4 Division 1 linebacker prospect by getting on his inside or outside shoulder and getting a well-timed pass.  Over and over again, Josh explains (and actually shows us) how to make this happen for the offense.

Quick Rhythm Option Routes is the first in what I hope to be many works from Josh Herring; he is an outstanding coach and we can all learn from him, regardless of one’s level of play.

About Coach Josh Herring

Josh Herring recently completed his 5th year as Offensive Coordinator and QB Coach at Lassiter High School in Marietta, Georgia. Known for their wide-open up-tempo offense, the Trojans have set numerous individual and team offensive records during his tenure.  Competing in the state’s largest classification, they reached the semi-finals in 2011 and won consecutive region championships in 2012 and 2013 with an undefeated regular season in 2012.  His QBs have led the region, county, and state in passing and 5 different offensive players have made All-State or Honorable Mention All-State teams, with a number going on to play collegiately, including in BCS conferences such as the SEC and ACC.  Coach Herring began his coaching career at Colbert Heights High School in Tuscumbia, Alabama, and over the course of four seasons served in various positions including Offensive Coordinator, Quarterbacks Coach, Wide Receivers Coach, and Running Backs Coach.  In 2007, his first year as offensive coordinator, the program achieved a school-record for wins and broke nearly every school offensive record.  His QB at Colbert Heights finished his 4 year career as Alabama’s all-time completions leader, ranking in the top 10 nationally. He spent the next two seasons as Wide Receivers Coach and Passing Game Coordinator at Pelham High School in Pelham, Alabama.  Coach Herring and his wife Ashley are both educators, and he teaches AP Government at Lassiter.