Available: Wide Receiver Skills and Drills in an Uptempo System

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Get it here for iPad/Mac

Tyler Dorton has coached 3 all-state players and 7 all-conference players in 4 years.  He’s worked hard on learning his craft and assembling a series of drills that allow him to accomplish much in a small period of individual time allotted to him in practice.  Dorton presents over 80 minutes worth of drills detailing not just what, but also the “why” behind the drills.  This is an outstanding manual for any receivers coach looking to refine his players skills and teach them to be effective on game day.

iPhone versions of Coaches Edge iBooks coming soon.

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No iPad or Mac?  No problem.  Dan Gonzalez’s The Need for Change and The Blue Print, Josh Herring’s Quick Rhythm Option Routes, and Brent Eckley’s RPO. Will be available soon in the iPhone version.

These versions will contain all of the content, but some of the interactive features are not supported on the iPhone.  The good news is all text, diagrams, and video are available.

To win these four titles for your iPhone email me at grabkj@gmail.com and put “iPhone” in the subject line.  We will draw the winner upon the release of the first title.

Dan Gonzalez Webinar Series

I’ve seen the content Dan is including, and you will not want to miss this.  He is including material that is not found in his books.  His ideas are cutting edge and will make any offense better.

Register here

Email me grabkj@gmail.com.  Put “Gonzalez” in the subject line. Upon your registration you will receive a code for A Coaching Arsenal iBook and be entered in a drawing to win 5 Coaches Edge current or future titles of your choice.

Get more great Coaches Edge Technologies interactive books.

Targeted Attack:  Using Tempo as a Weapon by Keith Grabowski

Over 20 tempo tools are discussed in detail and further explained with game video.  If you are not including Tempo as part of your attack, you are missing huge opportunities to move the football.  Lean more here

Want some RPO now?

RPO is something you will see a section on in several of our iBooks.

Josh Herring includes it in Quick Rhythm Option Routes.  This concept is a great tool for any offense, and he has utilized quick rhythm routes with run pass options as well.

101+ Read Game Plays by Keith Grabowski includes a variety of read game components, RPO, and play action off of the read game.

Pin & Pull Resources

Follow me on twitter: @CoachKGrabowski

Pin and Pull has been a great play to allow us to get the ball out on the perimeter with force.  Here are a list of resources beginning with my own.  I have a detailed chapter on pin and pull in my iBook 101+ Pro Style Pistol Offense Plays for the iPad and Mac. Here are some Pin and Pull Resources to aid you in learning more about the scheme:

From Me:

My article on AFM

Pin and Pull from the Spread

Trailer on my AFM Video on Pin&Pull

Sweep Read that Attacks Both Perimeters

Use the Proper Tool-Pulling Technique

Smart Football/Chris Brown:

Outside Zone Variant:  Pin & Pull

Sweep Read Play

Colt’s Stretch Play

Fishduck:

Sweep Read Play

Strong Football

Loosening Up the Box

Misc:

Pin & Pull Scheme Cut-Ups

Pin & Pull Cut-ups

Auburn Buck Sweep

Complementing the Power O

Offensive Line-Sweep Pulls

On AFM: Key to Successful Power Read-QB/Sweeper Mesh

Having a week one bye has allowed me some extra time to watch both high school and college football for the last few weeks. A play that I’ve seen numerous times is the inverted veer or “power read.” It’s a play that puts major stress on the defense as it is an option play that can attack inside or outside. For teams that have an athlete at quarterback and some speed from either a receiver or tailback, this is a play that with practice and repetition can put some explosiveness in an offense.
In studying some game film of this play, the different scenarios of what can happen can be minimized. In setting up drills or practice reps, defenders can be controlled to give the offense a look at the possibilities that need to be taken into account. Film study also revealed some key coaching points to make this an effective play.

Read more here.

Inside Zone and Outside Zone Technique

Another good one from Coach Mountjoy.

NOTE: O-LINE SPLITS = 18” (CONSISTENT):

INSIDE ZONE TECHNIQUE (DRIVE BLOCK TECHNIQUES):

. COVERED: Take a 6” lead step aiming eyes at playside number. Second step to crotch (do not crossover). Hands at base of shoulder pads.

2. If DLM stretches with you – stay on block and uncovered teammate works up on LBer.

3. If DLM anchors on you – double team with uncovered teammate. Stay on block until wiped off & then work upfield aiming eyes to playside number of LBer.

4. If DLM slants inside – force him to flatten his slant and double team with uncovered teammate. Stay on block until wiped off & then work upfield aiming eyes to playside number of LBer.

. UNCOVERED: Take a 6” lead step aiming eyes at helmet of DLM. Do not cross over on second step.

1. If helmet goes out on your 1st step – 2nd step upfield aiming eyes to playside number of LBer.

2. If helmet stays put – double team (hip to hip) with covered teammate & wipe him off on Lber.

3. If helmet slants inside – get eyes to his playside number. Double team with covered teammate & wipe him off on LBer.

OUTSIDE ZONE TECHNIQUE (REACH BLOCK TECHNIQUES):

. COVERED: Take a 6” lead step aiming eyes at playside arm pit. Second step slightly outside crotch (do not crossover). Inside hand on midline & outside hand under armpit.

2. If DLM stretches with you – stay on block and uncovered teammate works up on LBer.

3. If DLM anchors on you – stay on block with eyes on playside arm pit.

4. If DLM slants inside – force him to flatten his slant by stiff arming him inside. Stay on block until you feel uncovered teammate & then come off aiming eyes to playside number of LBer.

. UNCOVERED: Take a 6” lead step aiming eyes at helmet of DLM. You may crossover on second step.

1. If helmet goes out & you haven’t contacted DLM by 3rd. step – work upfield aiming eyes to playside armpit of LBer.

2. If helmet stays put – shove him over to covered teammate and work upfield aiming eyes to playside armpit of LBer.

3. If helmet slants inside – aim eyes to his playside armpit. Take him over & wipe covered teammate off to LBer.

ZONE RULES:

TEACH “COVERED/UNCOVERED” (TO DETERMINES WHO ZONE BLOCKS
AND WHO MAN BLOCKS).

. IF YOU ARE UNCOVERED (BY A DLM) – ZONE WITH YOUR PLAYSIDE TEAMMATE.

. IF YOU ARE COVERED (BY A DLM) – ZONE WITH YOUR BACKSIDE TEAMMATE (UNLESS HE IS COVERED THEN YOU MUST MAN BLOCK).

NOTE: IF YOUR MAN IS STACKED IN A “TANDEM” – ZONE WITH TEAMMATE WHOSE MAN IS ALSO STACKED.

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DRILLING ZONE BLOCKING:

1. INDIVIDUAL: (bags OR live) “1 vs. 1”

A) INSIDE ZONE

—-1. Drive Block DLM

—-2. Drive Block LBer

B) OUTSIDE ZONE

—-1. Reach Block DLM

—-2. Reach Block LBer

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2. SMAll GROUP: (INSIDE & OUTSIDE ZONE TECHNIQUES – vs. bags OR live)

A) “2 vs. 2” (uncovered man & covered man work vs. a ILer & DLM).

—–1. DLM widens & LBer steps inside of DLM

—–2. DML pinches inside & LBer scrapes outside

—–3. DLM anchors on covered man & LBer moves behind DLM (reading the RB)

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3. LARGE GROUP: (LIVE)

A) “5 ON 5” (Live – NO bags)

————M
—–E–T—–T–E
—–O-O-C-O-O
———–Q

———–R

4-3 = Gives the Center a chance to zone with Guards (on zone TO callside)

———-B—–B
——E—–N—–E
——O-O-C-O-O
————Q

————R

3-4 Gives the Guards a chance to zone with Tackles (on zone TO callside) or Center (on zone AWAY callside)

B) “7 on 7” (Live – no bags)

———–W—-M—–S
——–E—–T—–T—–E
——–O-O-O-C-O-O-O
—————–Q

—————–R

4-3 = Gives the Tackles a chance to zone with the TE’s (on zone TO callside), or the Guards (on zone AWAY callside)

NOTE: The “5 on 5” & “7 on 7” should be your best (“O”) vs. best (“D”). Full speed with no tackling the RB. Benefits of these:

1. COMPETITIVE DRILLS VS. DEFENSE;
2. BLOCKING TECHNIQUES VS. BLOCK REACTIONS;
3. TEACHES TOUGHNESS!!!!!

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4. TEAM (11 vs. 11)

Thanks again to Coach Mountjoy for providing this info. The zone running game is a big part of our offense. Learn mor about it in my iBook, 101+ Pro Style Pistol Offense Plays. Get it for you iPad here.

On American Football Monthly: Pulling Linemen

I would like to thank our offensive line coach Tony Neymeiyer for his assistance with this article.
Most offenses use schemes that require a lineman to pull and block a defender on the first level or second level. I’ve heard arguments from time to time about which technique is best for a pulling lineman – a “square” pull or an “skip” pull. The fact of the matter is that each serves a different purpose and has its uses within certain schemes.
The same pull style cannot be used for every play because each play requires the pulling lineman to do different things. It’s equivalent to having to not ask a lineman to utilize the same footwork on inside zone as he would on outside zone – both plays are distinctly different from each other even though they have similarities. For the same reason, pulls must be executed based on what you want the puller to accomplish in his block.
Before we get into the specifics of each technique, let’s define each type and give examples of the schemes that use each type…more here

Learn more about the plays and schemes in which these techniques are used in my iBook for the iPad 101+ Pro Style Pistol Offense Plays. Get it here.

When it shows up on film: OL combo block

I wrote on this topic in detail in a clinic article on AFM titled “Distort and Displace with Double Teams.”

We are able to be efficient in teaching our combo because the block applies to both our zone and power schemes.

Here are clips of two different phases of our combo drill. In the first we are really emphasizing staying on the block and getting vertical displacement.

In the second clip we are working the combo vertically and then coming off to the linebacker.

Obviously, with the time we spend on this technique we want to see it show up on film. Here it is in game video on our power play. The left guard and left tackle take the defensive tackle vertically before the guard comes off to the linebacker who has played over the top.

Learn more about our power play and other components of our offense in 101+ Pro Style Pistol Offense Plays which you can get on your iPad from the iBookstore:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/101+-pro-style-pistol-offense/id611588645?mt=11